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Search results for "middle east"

 


Ari  Adut

Ari Adut

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts
ariadut@mail.la.utexas.edu
+1 512 232 4284

Expertise: Comparative and Historical Sociology; Social Theory; Political Sociology; Media and the Public Sphere Sociology of Culture; Sociology of Law; Sociology of Emotions; Western Europe; Middle East; Qualitative and Historical Methods; Sociology.

Mahmoud M Al-Batal

Mahmoud M Al-Batal

Professor Emeritus, Department of Middle Eastern Studies, College of Liberal Arts
ma426@aub.edu

Expertise: Arabic language and literature; Arabic linguistics; teaching Arabic as a foreign language; Arabic teacher training; Lebanon

Kamran  Ali

Kamran Ali

Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts
asdar@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 3550, +1 512 471 7531

Expertise: Gender; health; development; labor history; political movements (including Islamic groups); Political Economy; post-colonialism; urban social histories, popular culture; historiography; memory; liberalism; Middle East; South Asia

Jason M Brownlee

Jason M Brownlee

Professor, Department of Government, College of Liberal Arts
brownlee@austin.utexas.edu

Expertise: Egypt; Iran; repression; democratization; American attempts at democracy promotion, Authoritarianism

Elizabeth J Catlos

Elizabeth J Catlos

Associate Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences
ejcatlos@jsg.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 4762

Expertise: Can also see https://www.catlos.work/ My primary research focus is <strong>geochemistry</strong>, and how the fundamentals of chemistry (mineral reactions, radiogenic and stable isotopes, major and trace elements) can be and are used to understand what the Earth was like in the past. In this, I have interests that span a broad range of range of plate boundary processes and laboratory approaches. Many ancient fault systems are clues to determine the evolution and migration of Earth's continents in the past, identify important economic resources that formed during specific times in Earth's history, and/or to assess geological hazards that result due to reactivation of older faults or mass movement of rocks. They are used to understand how plate tectonics operates today and how it operated in the past. I am interested in constraining the evolution of a number of fault systems and mountain ranges that formed during the closure of ancient ocean systems primarily across Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. <br> <br>For example, a major portion of my <strong>Himalayan research </strong> agenda involves constraining past motion on the Main Central Thrust, a large-scale shear zone that worked to create the highest mountains on the planet. I currently use novel geochemical and geochronological approaches that take advantage of modern-day technology to understand how <strong> garnet-bearing rocks </strong> moved at a high-resolution scale within that structure. Garnets are chemical tape recorders, and their chemical elements can be used to ascertain the pressures and temperatures they experienced. They also enclose radioactive minerals, such as monazite, that can be dated to time their history. Data from numerous garnet-bearing rocks across the Main Central Thrust can be used to inform us regarding how and when the Himalayas uplifted in the past, and lend insight into the motion that affects it today. To this end, I collaborate and learn from other researchers, such as geophysicists and modelers. <br> <br>I apply similar approaches to garnet-bearing rocks found in extensional systems in western <strong>Turkey</strong>. In this region, the plate boundary experienced a major switch in the geological past from compression to extension. Again, I apply new approaches in the thermodynamic modeling and geochronology to garnets in this locale to understand why and how this plate tectonic transition occurred. <br> <br>In this portion of my research, I also include the study of <strong>granites</strong>, as these igneous bodies emplaced during the extensional phase. The timing of their formation is key pieces of information regarding how extension occurred in western Turkey, both in time and space. To this end, I pioneered new imaging approaches to their study, and collaborate with economic geologists in Turkey who are interested in how heat and fluid flow around these granite bodies are intricately involved in the formation of ore resources. Their research sparked my interest in granite petrology, and I also study this rock type in China and Slovakia. Some of these granites formed at ancient plate boundaries as continents collided, and their ages and chemistry constrain when and what types of geological processes operated during their formation. <br> <br>The approaches I apply (geochemistry and geochronology) are of interest to a wide variety of researchers, so I collaborate and involve students in projects that include other geologists. An example of this is the dating of radioactive minerals from <strong>ancient meteorite impact craters and massive volcanic eruptions</strong>, events that are key for shaping how life evolved in Earth's history. These projects involve the use of modern and ever-evolving <strong>technological advances in geochemistry</strong>, such as the laser ablation of tiny zircon crystals, or the use of instruments that do not require minerals to be separated from rocks, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). <br> <br>I am interested in <strong>accessory minerals</strong>, such as zircon and monazite, and what controls their appearance in metamorphic and igneous rocks. Monazite, in particular, has been a focus of my research and I have key expertise in its formation, composition, geochronology, and its use as a rare earth resource. <br> <br>Although my research primarily involves compressional and extensional plate boundaries and igneous and metamorphic rocks, I recently delved into understanding sedimentary rocks from along the North Anatolian Fault, a major strike-slip system in north-central Turkey. In this research, we obtained oxygen isotopes across transects along calcite-filled fractures in limestones using SIMS. These calcite-filled fractures have the potential to record their source and provide key insight into the history of the limestones as well as their use for recording modern day fluid flow driven by seismic activity along the active fault system. <br> <br>Fundamentally, my research is <strong>field-based</strong> and involves the mapping and collection of rocks and understanding their importance in addressing research questions regarding what the Earth was like in the past. The research is <strong>laboratory-based</strong>, and I take advantage of modern advances in technology applied to geosciences, including numerous facilities at UT Austin and elsewhere.

Mounira M Charrad

Mounira M Charrad

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts
charrad@utexas.edu
+1 512 232 6300, +1 512 232 6311

Expertise: Political Sociology; State Formation; Social Movements; Gender and Women's Rights; Colonialism; Comparative-Historical Sociology; Middle East and North Africa; gender issues

Richard R Flores

Richard R Flores

Professor, Department of Mexican American and Latino/a Studies, College of Liberal Arts
flores@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Expertise: Cultural theory; folklore and expressive culture; Mexican American history and culture; public history of the Alamo; critical race theory; cultural citizenship; cultural studies; higher education leadership

Jo A Hackett

Jo A Hackett

Professor Emeritus, Department of Middle Eastern Studies, College of Liberal Arts
hackett15@icloud.com

Expertise: Old Testament, epigraphy, Phoenician language and religion; the period of Judges; women's lives in the ancient Near East; "fertility" religion; sacrifice, including child sacrifice; the study of myths and mythology; polemic against foreigners in the ancient Near East; and computer imaging of Ugaritic tablets; religion

Clement M Henry

Clement M Henry

Professor Emeritus, Department of Government, College of Liberal Arts
chenry@mail.utexas.edu

Expertise: Political economy; comparative politics; Middle East and North Africa - esp. Algeria Egypt Morocco Tunisia; politics of international oil; Islamic financial systems; commercial banking systems in the MENA; business, economics & labor.

Brian K Horton

Brian K Horton

Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences
horton@jsg.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 1869

Expertise: Tectonics of sedimentary basins, evolution of orogenic systems, sediment provenance and routing systems, nonmarine depositional processes.

Syed A Hyder

Syed A Hyder

Associate Professor, Department of Asian Studies, College of Liberal Arts
akbarhyder@utexas.edu

Expertise: Islam in South Asia, Urdu language and literature, Aesthetics in South Asian and the Middle East

Charles  Kerans

Charles Kerans

Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences
ckerans@jsg.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 3519, +1 512 471 4282

Expertise: Carbonate sequence stratigraphy, depositional systems, reservoir characterization, basin analysis, seismic interpretation, seismic stratigraphy, paleokarst analysis, carbonate diagenesis

Stephen E Laubach

Stephen E Laubach

Senior Research Scientist, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences
steve.laubach@beg.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 1534, +1 512 471 6303

Expertise: Structural diagenesis, structural geology, fracture analysis, fluid inclusion and cathodoluminescence studies, rock mechanics, mechanical and fracture stratigraphy, hydrocarbon exploration and development in deep and/or structurally complex areas, tight gas sandstone, coalbed methane, shale gas; geothermal, geologic aspects of hydraulic fracturing, application of borehole-imaging geophysical logs to stress and fracture evaluation, structural evolution of North American Cordillera, fracture history of NW Scotland, regional fracture studies Argentina.

Rachel Davis  Mersey

Rachel Davis Mersey

Associate Dean, Research, School of Journalism and Media, Moody College of Communication
rdm@austin.utexas.edu

Expertise: how and why individuals consume or avoid media experiences; craft media products that encourage pro-social behavior

Stephennie  Mulder

Stephennie Mulder

Associate Professor, Department of Art and Art History, College of Fine Arts
smulder@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 5851

Expertise: Middle East archaeology, architectural history, and cultural heritage

Richard J Reddick

Richard J Reddick

Senior Vice Provost and Dean of the Undergraduate College
richard.reddick@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 7551, +1 512 475 8587

Expertise: Examines the experiences of faculty of color at predominantly White institutions; mentoring relationships between faculty and Black students; and work-life balance in academia.

Sonia T Seeman

Sonia T Seeman

Associate Professor, Sarah and Ernest Butler School of Music, College of Fine Arts
stseeman@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 2854

Expertise: world music; Romani ("Gypsy") communities; Southeastern Europe, Turkish, Former Ottoman culture and music; inclusive pedagogy; neighborhood/grassroots activism; culture of diasporic commmunities; migration