Summit on Race


The LBJ Foundation is presenting The Summit on Race in America, April 8-10th. The three-day summit being held at the LBJ Presidential Library, on the campus of The University of Texas at Austin, is a seminal event to explore our nation's continuing racial divide and struggle for racial equality. Civil rights legends and leaders, community activists, musicians, and comedians will speak out to explore the nation's continuing racial divide and struggle for racial equality.

If you are seeking expertise on other subjects, please call University Media Relations at 512-471-3151 or consult our general Media Experts Guide.



Activism


Minkah  Makalani

Minkah Makalani

Director , John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies
+1 512 471 4745, makalani@austin.utexas.edu

Minkah Makalani is Director for the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies, and Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. His work and teaching focus on intellectual history, black political thought, radical social movements, Caribbean independence, Black Power, race and racial identity, and hip-hop. His first book, In the Cause of Freedom: Radical Black Internationalism from Harlem to London, 1917-1939 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011), examines the black radical encounter within organized Marxism among early twentieth century Caribbean radicals in Harlem and London, and considers how these activist-intellectuals drew on their experiences of racial oppression, colonial domination, and diasporic interactions prompted their independent political organizing and informed their engagement with western radical thought to articulate a black internationalist politics. He is also co-editor of Escape from New York: The New Negro Renaissance beyond Harlem (University Press of Minnesota, 2013), with Davarian Baldwin. His articles have appeared in Small Axe, Social Text, South Atlantic Quarterly, Souls, The Journal of African American History, and Women, Gender, and Families of Color.

Eric L Mcdaniel

Eric L Mcdaniel

Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 7268, emcdaniel@austin.utexas.edu

Eric McDaniel specializes in racial and ethnic politics, religion and politics and health policy. His book, "Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches" (2008), examines why Black religious institutions choose to become involved in political matters. Further, he has also examined the role of religious beliefs in shaping political behavior. His work in health policy examines how citizens interpret government involvement in treating health epidemics and how political empowerment can reduce health disparities. His recent publications include "What Kind of Christian Are You?: Religious Ideologies and Political Attitudes." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (forthcoming); “National Pride and the Boundaries of American Citizenship." Journal of Racial and Ethnic Politics (co-authored with McDaniel, Eric, L., Irfan Nooruddin and Allyson Shortle 2016).

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Leonard N Moore

Leonard N Moore

Executive Director, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)
+1 512 471 3212, leonardmoore@mail.utexas.edu

Leonard N. Moore is professor of history specializing in Modern African American History; black urban history; intersection of race, sport, and hip-hop. He is currently serving also as the Senior Associate Vice-President for Campus Diversity and the Interim Deputy Director for Minority Recruitment. His books include "Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power in America" and "Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina" (2010). He is currently working on another book project, titled "God’s Trombone: The Life of Adam Clayton Powell". In addition to his academic and administrative work, Dr. Moore spends a great deal of time helping high-profile athletic programs across the country implement strategic diversity initiatives that help student-athletes excel both in the classroom and on the field. Dr. Moore is highly active in initiating and executing programs for retaining and increasing diversity. His professional service in Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence include programs, such as Summer Bridge Program, Gateway Program, Ace Program, GradPrep Program UTransition Program, Longhorn Link Program, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program, Intellectual Entrepreneurship Minority Male Initiative among others.

Luis  Urrieta

Luis Urrieta


+1 512 232 4129, urrieta@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Dr. Luis Urrieta, Jr. is Professor of Cultural Studies in Education. He is (by courtesy) affiliated faculty in the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS), the Native American & Indigenous Studies Program (NAIS), and the Lozano Long-Benson Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS). Dr. Urrieta's research interests center around 1) cultural and racial identities, 2) agency as social and cultural practices, 3) social movements and collective action related to education, and 4) learning in family and community contexts. He is specifically interested in Chicanx, Latinx, and Indigenous (P'urhépecha) cultures and identities, activism as a social practice in educational spaces, in oral and narrative traditions in qualitative research, and Indigenous knowledge systems and research methodologies. Luis Urrieta received his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003. He has been a resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, New Mexico; a Fulbright Garcia Robles Fellow in Mexico; a fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the Spencer Foundation, and the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education. Dr. Urrieta held the Lee Hage Jamail Regents Chair in Education from 2006 to 2008, and currently holds the Suzanne B. and John L. Adams Professorship in Education. In 2012 he was honored with the Alumni Achievement Award from the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Urrieta is the author of the award winning book, "Working from Within: Chicana and Chicano Activist Educators in Whitestream Schools" (2009, University of Arizona Press), in addition to an extensive publishing record. Hi most recent book is a co-edited volume (with George W. Noblit) titled Cultural Constructions of Identity: Meta-ethnography and Theory (2018, Oxford University Press). Dr. Urrieta was also honored as a César E. Chávez champion of change by the White House in 2014.

Civil Rights


Don E Carleton

Don E Carleton

Executive Director , Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
+1 512 495 4527, d.carleton@austin.utexas.edu

Don Carleton has been executive director of The University of Texas at Austin's Dolph Briscoe Center for American History since its creation in 1991. He has published and lectured extensively in the fields of historical research methods and sources, the history of broadcast journalism, and Twentieth Century U.S. political history.

Media Contact: Joey Williams, joey.williams@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-3716

Edwin  Dorn

Edwin Dorn

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 232 4007, eddorn@utexas.edu

Ed Dorn became Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs in September 1997, after spending 20 years in Washington shaping and studying public policy. His last Washington job was at the Pentagon, where he served from 1993 to 1997, initially as an Assistant Secretary and later as an Under Secretary of Defense. Mr. Dorn also worked at the US Education Department and at two "think tanks"--the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the Brookings Institution. His first position in Washington, in 1977, was as a special assistant to the then-Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Joseph Califano. As Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, Mr. Dorn's policy responsibilities included recruiting, training, pay and benefits for the total force of more than three million military and civilian personnel. He also oversaw the Defense Health Program, the Commissary System, Overseas Dependent Schools and the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute. A native Texan, Mr. Dorn is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of UT-Austin. In 1967-68, he was a Fulbright Scholar at the Center for West African Studies at the University of Birmingham, England. He completed an M.A. in African studies at the University of Indiana-Bloomington and a Ph.D. in political science at Yale. From 1970-72, he served on active duty with the US Army in Germany. Mr. Dorn's major publications include "Rules and Racial Equality" (Yale, 1979) and an edited volume, "Who Defends America?" (Joint Center, 1989). He has been an advisor to two PBS-TV Series: "Congress: We The People" and the civil rights documentary "Eyes on the Prize." His affiliations include the Institute for Defense Analyses, the Kettering Foundation and the United Way/Capital Area. In 1999, Dorn was named a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Texas at Austin.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Ranjana  Natarajan

Ranjana Natarajan

Clinical Professor , School of Law
+1 512 232 7222, rnatarajan@law.utexas.edu

Natarajan’s research interests include national security detention, electronic and other types of surveillance and criminal prosecution issues. She has experience litigating and advocating on a variety of civil rights and civil liberties issues including immigration detention, civil rights post 9/11, gender equity and prisoners' rights.

Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

Robert H Wilson

Robert H Wilson

Professor; Mike Hogg Professor in Urban Policy , Department of Geography and the Environment , College of Liberal Arts
, rwilson@utexas.edu

Robert H. Wilson is Mike Hogg Professor of Urban Policy in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He teaches in areas of local and state economic development policy, urban policy in developing countries, and econometrics. His research activities are in the areas of local and state development strategies, community participation in state and local policymaking, telecommunications and development, and public policy in Brazil. He was Assistant Dean at the LBJ School from 1980 through 1983, served as the coordinator of the Ph.D. Program in Public Policy from 1991 through 1994, and currently is Deputy Director. Before coming to the LBJ School, he taught at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil. He has served as a principal researcher on projects and grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ford Foundation, National Science Foundation, Fulbright Commission, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Texas Telephone Association, and Toms Rivera Center. He has also served on projects or consulted for the Economic Research Service of USDA, United Nations Development Program, Organization of American States, Urban Institute, National Research Council, Texas Legislative Education Board, and Texas Historical Commission.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Diversity and Educational Access


Jennifer K Adair

Jennifer K Adair

Associate Professor , Department of Curriculum and Instruction , College of Education
, jenniferadair@utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Jennifer Keys Adair, PhD is Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Adair also currently oversees the Agency and Young Children Research Collective and is the director of Dynamic Innovation for Young Children, a partnership with the San Antonio Independent School District to re-design preK-3rd grade classrooms district-wide. Her work focuses on the connection between agency and discrimination in the learning experiences of young children and how we can engage young children in authentic learning experiences about race, community and their real lives. Dr. Adair is a former Young Scholars Fellow with the Foundation for Child Development where she conducted a video-cued ethnographic study of children’s agency and its impact on social and academic development. She recently completed a major Spencer Foundation study on civic agency in preschool classrooms serving Maori, Aboriginal and Latinx immigrant communities in New Zealand, Australia and the United States respectively. Trained as a cultural anthropologist and filmmaker, Dr. Adair uses video-cued ethnography to privilege the voices and perspectives of young children, teachers and parents and how they see and understand schooling. Dr. Adair has published in numerous journals including Harvard Educational Review, Race, Ethnicity and Education, Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, Young Children, Anthropology and Education Quarterly and Teachers College Record. She currently serves on the editorial board of Teachers College Record and Anthropology and Education Quarterly. She lectures in multiple countries and her work, reports and expertise have been covered by many media outlets including NPR, CNN, The Conversation, Huffington Post, Time, Christian Science Monitor, and The Washington Post. She is the co-author of Children Crossing Borders: Immigrant Parent and Preschool Teacher Perspectives on Preschool for Children of Immigrants. And her new book – Segregation by Experience: Agency, Racism and Early Learning published by The University of Chicago Press is due out at the end of 2020.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Anthony L Brown

Anthony L Brown

Professor , Department of Curriculum and Instruction , College of Education
+1 512 232 3902, alb@austin.utexas.edu

Anthony Brown is a Professor of Curriculum & Instruction in Social Studies Education. He also is an affiliated faculty in the areas of cultural studies in education, the John Warfield Center of African and African American studies and the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He received his B.A and M.A. in political science from California State University-Long Beach and received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research agenda falls into two interconnected strands of research, related broadly to the education of African Americans. His first strand of research examines how educational stakeholders make sense of and respond to the educational needs of African American male students. The second strand examines how school curriculum depicts the historical experiences of African Americans in official school knowledge (e.g. standards and textbooks) and within popular discourse. Overall, his work pursues a theoretical argument, which suggests that the examination of the historical and racial constructions of African Americans within the social sciences, educational literature, popular discourse and curriculum is vital to making sense of how questions are raised and how educational and curricular reforms are pursued for African American students in the present. His work has been published in Teachers College Record, Harvard Educational Review, Race Ethnicity and Education and the Journal of Educational Policy. Professor Brown is the recipient of numerous awards, including: Texas Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award and the AERA Division B, 2016 Outstanding Book Award.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Keffrelyn D Brown

Keffrelyn D Brown

Professor , Department of Curriculum and Instruction , College of Education
+1 512 232 4257, keffrelyn@austin.utexas.edu

Keffrelyn D. Brown (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) is the Suzanne B. and John L. Adams Endowed Professor of Education and Distinguished University Teaching Professor of Cultural Studies in Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. She is the co-founder and co-director (with Dr. Anthony Brown) of the Center for Innovation in Race, Teaching, and Curriculum. She also holds a faculty appointment in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies, the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies and the Center for Women and Gender Studies. Her research and teaching focuses on the sociocultural knowledge of race in teaching and curriculum, critical multicultural teacher education and the educational discourses and intellectual thought related to African Americans and their educational experiences in the U.S. Keffrelyn has published over 50 books, journal articles, book chapters and other educational texts. She serves on the editorial boards for several well-recognized peer-reviewed journals including Teachers College Record, Race, Ethnicity and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education and Urban Education. Her most recent book, After the "At-Risk" Label: Reorienting Risk in Educational Policy and Practice was published by Teachers College Press. Keffrelyn has received recognition for both her research and teaching. In 2017 she received the Division K Mid-career Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA). In 2013 she was awarded the Kappa Delta Pi/Division K Early Career Research Award from AERA. She is also the recipient of numerous fellowships, including the Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship and the Wisconsin-Spencer Foundation Research Training Grant. In 2012 she received the Regent's Outstanding Teaching award, the highest teaching honor given for excellence in undergraduate teaching across the University of Texas system. She was inducted in the Provost's Teaching Fellows program at UT-Austin in 2017 and in its Academy of Distinguished Teaching in 2019. Keffrelyn is a sought after presenter in her local, regional and national communities. She is active in the multiple roles she has as a researcher, teacher, teacher educator and critically engaged community member. As a former elementary and middle school teacher, school administrator, and curriculum developer, Keffrelyn is keen to the everyday challenges of schooling.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Joshua  Childs

Joshua Childs

Assistant Professor , Department of Educational Leadership and Policy , College of Education
, joshuachilds@austin.utexas.edu

Joshua Childs is an assistant professor in the Educational Policy and Planning program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy. His research examines the role of interorganizational networks and cross-sector collaborations to address complex educational issues. He also investigates collaborative approaches involving organizations (local, state, and national) that have the potential to improve academic achievement and opportunities for students in urban and rural schools. Joshua graduated from Plano West High School, ran track & field and received a B.A. in Elementary Education from the University of Tulsa, earned an M.A. in Education Policy from University of Colorado-Boulder, and PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy from the University of Pittsburgh.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Kevin O Cokley

Kevin O Cokley

Department Chair , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
+1 512 471 7498, kcokley@austin.utexas.edu

Kevin Cokley's research can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial and ethnic identity development, academic motivation and academic achievement. A theme of much of his research is understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Cokley's research and scholarship have led him to challenge the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and to critically re-examine the impact of racial and ethnic identity and gender on academic achievement. Recently Cokley has started exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes among ethnic minority students. Cokley's publications have appeared in professional journals such as the Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Black Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Individual Differences and Personality, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and the Harvard Educational Review. Cokley has a joint appointment in the College of Education's Department of Educational Psychology and the College of Liberal Arts' Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the Past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology and the Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets including the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, The Conversation and The Hill on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, police shootings of Blacks, the aftermath of Ferguson, the use of school vouchers, racial disparities in school discipline, and Black students’ graduation rates. [italic]Kevin Cokley is not currently accepting new graduate students for the 2022-23 Academic Year.[/italic]

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Terrance L Green

Terrance L Green

Associate Professor , Department of Educational Leadership and Policy , College of Education
, tgreen@austin.utexas.edu

Terrance L. Green is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy. Dr. Green’s research examines the relationship between educational leadership, schools, and neighborhood-communities, with a focus on racial and educational equity. His work centers on three related research strands: 1) the role of educational leaders in equity-focused school-family-community partnerships, 2) the intersection of school reform and equitable community development, with a focus on the impacts of neighborhood gentrification on schools, and 3) institutional change approaches to racial and educational equity in school districts and schools. His research has been published in several journals including Teachers College Record, Educational Administration Quarterly, Journal of School Leadership, The Urban Review, and Urban Education. In addition, Dr. Green’s research has been nationally recognized, and he has received several prestigious awards and grant funding to support his work. In 2018, he was awarded one of thirty National Academy of Education (NAEd) Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowships, and in 2017, Dr. Green received the Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Division A (which focuses on Administration, Organization, and Leadership). In 2016, he was recipient of the William J. Davis Award for the most outstanding article published in a volume of Educational Administration Quarterly, which is the top journal in the field of educational leadership and administration. Dr. Green’s research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation and the William T. Grant Foundation. Dr. Green has written several opinion editorials on key education topics that have been featured in a variety of popular press venues such as: TIME.com, The Houston Chronicle, Dallas Morning News, Austin American Statesman, Texas Tribune, Detroit Free Press, and the McAllen Monitor. Green earned a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a B.S. in Biology Education from Kentucky State University, a Historically Black College & University (HBCU). Prior to earning his doctorate, he was a high school science teacher. Check out some of Dr. Green's work below: [link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrF2ZW9Cbv4]College of Education Video[/link] Op-ed: [link:http://time.com/4446768/back-to-school-questions/TIME.com[/link] Op-ed: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion/outlook/article/Why-Texas-school-districts-should-rethink-13476262.php Op-ed: [link:http://www.freep.com/story/opinion/readers/2015/07/17/detroit-schools-segregation/30322513/]What it will take to truly desegregate Detroit schools[/link] https://www.fox7austin.com/video/610239

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Carolyn  Heinrich

Carolyn Heinrich

Research Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 3779, cheinrich@austin.utexas.edu

Carolyn Heinrich (Ph.D., University of Chicago) is the Sid Richardson Professor of Public Affairs and affiliated Professor of Economics and the Director of the Center for Health and Social Policy at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin. Prior to her appointment on July 1, 2011, she was the Director of the La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Heinrich's research focuses on social welfare policy, labor force development, public management and econometric methods for program evaluation. She works directly in her research with governments at all levels, including with the federal government on evaluations of workforce development programs, with states on their social welfare and child support programs, and school districts in the evaluation of supplemental educational services and other educational interventions. She also collaborates with nongovernmental organizations such as the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, UNICEF and others in research to improve program and policy design and the impacts and effectiveness of economic and social investments in middle-income and developing countries. Other ongoing projects involve the study of labor market intermediaries and labor market outcomes for low-skilled and disadvantaged workers, performance management and contracting, health-care reform provisions and policy factors that support effective provision of substance abuse treatment services, and conditional cash transfers and related poverty-reduction interventions. She is the President and a founding board member of the Public Management Research Association and served as the editor of the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory from January 2005 through December 2008. She also served on the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management from 2004-2007 and as its chair of the Board of Institutional Representatives through spring 2011. In 2004, Heinrich received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contributions to the field of public policy analysis and management by a person under age 40, and in 2010, she and was elected to the National Academy of Public Administration. She has published more than 60 peer-reviewed books and journal articles.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Richard J Reddick

Richard J Reddick

Associate Dean for Equity, Community Engagement, and Outreach , College of Education
+1 512 471 7551, +1 512 475 8587, richard.reddick@austin.utexas.edu

Richard J. Reddick, Ed.D. is the [link:https://education.utexas.edu/about/college-leadership/richard-reddick]inaugural associate dean for equity, community engagement, and outreach[/link] for the College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin. He is also Professor in the [link:https://education.utexas.edu/departments/educational-leadership-policy/graduate-programs/program-higher-education-leadership-phd-edd-program]Program in Higher Education Leadership[/link] in the [link:https://education.utexas.edu/departments/educational-leadership-policy]Department of Educational Leadership and Policy (ELP)[/link] at [link:https://www.utexas.edu]The University of Texas at Austin[/link], where he has served as a faculty member since 2007. Additionally, Dr. Reddick serves as the Assistant Director of the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/plan2/]Plan II Honors Program[/link] in the College of Liberal Arts. Dr. Reddick is a faculty member by courtesy in the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/aads/index.php]Department for African and African Diaspora Studies[/link], the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/caaas/]John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies[/link], and a fellow at the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/iupra/]Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis[/link]. Dr. Reddick co-chairs the [link:https://provost.utexas.edu/diversity/council-racial-and-ethnic-equity-and-diversity]Council for Racial and Ethnic Equity and Diversity (CREED)[/link], serves on the [link:https://ugs.utexas.edu/sig/faculty-involvement/scac]Signature Course Advisory Committee (SCAC)[/link], and was named to the [link:https://provost.utexas.edu/news/inaugural-cohort-announced-provosts-distinguished-service-academy]inaugural cohort of the Provost's Distinguished Service Academy[/link]. Dr. Reddick is the faculty co-chair for the [link:https://www.gse.harvard.edu/ppe/program/institute-educational-management-iem]Institute for Educational Management (IEM)[/link] at Harvard University, and teaches in the [link:https://www.gse.harvard.edu/ppe/program/institute-management-and-leadership-education-mle]Institute for Management Leadership in Education[/link]. In spring 2018, Dr. Reddick was appointed as a Visiting Associate Professor at the [link:https://www.gse.harvard.edu/]Harvard Graduate School of Education[/link]. Dr. Reddick is an award winning teacher and scholar; awarded the Eyes of Texas Excellence Award in 2008, the [link:https://texasexes.org/involved/oytex-current-recipients.aspx]Outstanding Young Texas Ex Award[/link], and the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies Teaching Award, both in 2012, the Black Faculty Staff Association Faculty Member of the Year in 2013, and the recipient of the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies Teaching Award in 2013. He spent the 2010-2011 academic year as a Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Career Enhancement Scholar. Dr. Reddick received the 2018 Austin L.E.A.D.S. Award from the [link:http://sites.austincc.edu/equityandinclusion/ideal/]Austin Community College Office of Equity and Inclusion’s I.D.E.A.L. Center[/link] and was named [link:https://diversity.utexas.edu/communityengagement/the-tower-awards/past-winners/]Outstanding Community Based Learning Professor[/link] at the 2019 Tower Awards. Dr. Reddick teaches graduate courses on the history of higher education, multicultural modes of mentoring, social and cultural contexts of education, and qualitative research methods. He also teaches undergraduate courses in Plan II Honors and the Signature Course program in Undergraduate Studies. Dr. Reddick earned his B.A. in Plan II Liberal Arts Honors and was named a College of Liberal Arts [link:http://www.utexas.edu/cola/alumni-and-giving/alumni-relations/DDG-Alumni-Association/Past-Recipients.php]Distinguished Dean’s Graduate[/link] in 1995. He then went on to teach elementary and middle school in the Fifth Ward community of Houston, Texas. Dr. Reddick went on to work in the student affairs field at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and Emory University. Dr. Reddick earned master’s and doctoral degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1998 and 2007, respectively. While a graduate student, Dr. Reddick worked closely with the School Leadership Program, helping to train teacher leaders, principals, and school developers, and also served as a School Director with Teach For America, training corps members. Additionally, Dr. Reddick edited the Harvard Educational Review and was a co-founder of the [link:http://www.facebook.com/HgseAlumniOfColorConference2013]Alumni of Color Conference (AOCC)[/link], a convening of scholars and practitioners focused on the educational experiences of scholars and students of color, now in its fifteenth year. Dr. Reddick was selected as [link:http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2008/06/commencement-marshal-richard-reddick-the-role-of-mentors/]Class Marshal of the Graduate School of Education[/link] at the 372nd Harvard University Commencement. Dr. Reddick served as the 2013 co-chair of the Faculty, Curriculum, and Teaching section for the Division J (Postsecondary Education) Program Committee for the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Dr. Reddick conducts ethnographic research on the experiences of faculty of color in predominantly White university settings, mentoring relationships in higher education, Black families in American society, and work-family balance in junior faculty fathers. Dr. Reddick’s research has been highlighted on [link:http://www.npr.org/search/index.php?searchinput="richard+reddick"&tabId=all&dateId=0&programId=0&topicId=0]NPR[/link], the [link:http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Texas-ranks-40th-in-residents-with-associate-s-1713809.php]Associated Press[/link], [link:https://www.pbs.org/video/reddick-fox-foster-t8ulbm/]PBS[/link], the [link:https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b2gs81]BBC[/link], the [link:http://chronicle.com/article/Men-on-the-Tenure-Track/130295/]Chronicle of Higher Education[/link], and he regularly presents his research at the annual meetings of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). Dr. Reddick has published articles in the top journals in education, and is the co-author and co-editor of four books. In addition to these scholarly activities, Dr. Reddick is a Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy! champion, husband to Sherry, and most importantly, dad to a 12- and 10-year old. Dr. Reddick is the board chair of [link:http://www.montessoriforall.org/]Montessori For All[/link], the first public Montessori school in East Austin, and serves on the Austin Regional Board for [link:https://ideapublicschools.org/regions/austin/]IDEA Public Schools[/link]. He is a proud graduate of Department of Defense Dependent Schools and the former Johnston High School in East Austin. You can follow Dr. Reddick on Twitter: [link:https://twitter.com/DrRichReddick]@DrRichReddick[/link]

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Victor  Saenz

Victor Saenz

Department Chair & Professor , Department of Educational Leadership and Policy , College of Education
+1 512 232 7519, +1 512 471 7551, vsaenz@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Victor B. Sáenz, Ph.D. is Chair of the [link:https://education.utexas.edu/departments/educational-leadership-policy]Department of Educational Leadership and Policy[/link] at the University of Texas at Austin and the W. K. Kellogg Professor in Community College Leadership. He also holds courtesy appointments with the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cmas/]Center for Mexican American Studies[/link], the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/mals/]Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies[/link], the [link:https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/ppi/]Irma Rangel Public Policy Institute, the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis[/link], and the [link:https://heri.ucla.edu/]UCLA Higher Education Research Institute[/link]. Sáenz's current work advances research-informed best practices and policy solutions that improve educational outcomes for underserved students in education, with a special emphasis on boys and young men of color. In 2010 Sáenz co-founded an award-winning initiative at UT-Austin called [link:http://diversity.utexas.edu/projectmales/]Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)[/link], a multi-pronged effort focused on advancing educational outcomes for male students of color (based within the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement). Under Project MALES he launched a nationally recognized Student Mentoring Program that partners with local schools to connect undergraduate peer mentors with middle school and high school male students. He also co-created a network of K-12 and higher education institutions called the [link:http://diversity.utexas.edu/txedconsortium/]Texas Education Consortium for Male Students of Color[/link] that focuses on advancing educational outcomes for this critical student population. Supported by grants from the Greater Texas Foundation (GTF), the Trellis Foundation, and the Kresge Foundation, this statewide collaborative focuses on improving educational outcomes for male students of color across the state of Texas. The Consortium is made up of over thirty institutional partners in K-12 and higher education, and it seeks to align and coordinate existing programs and services that target underrepresented male students across the education continuum. Over the years, Sáenz has received various research and service recognitions for his support of schools, students, and communities (e.g., Somos Austin, Seedling Mentors, Catch the Next). In 2009 he was named by Diverse Magazine as "One of 25 to Watch" diversity leaders in American higher education. In fall 2010, he was recognized as one of seven "ING Professors of Excellence" among over two thousand faculty members at the University of Texas. In 2018 he received a Research Award from the AERA Hispanic Research Issues SIG. He has also earned several faculty fellowships at UT-Austin and is currently the holder of the W.K. Kellogg Professorship in Community College Leadership. Sáenz has co-authored three books and has published dozens of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and his work has been cited in numerous policy reports, scholarly publications, and by local and national media. He has presented his research at countless conferences and meetings across the country, including at the White House, the National Press Club, and on Capitol Hill. Sáenz is a member of two distinguished editorial boards for peer-reviewed journals in his field, and he is an active member of several national associations focused on higher education issues, including ASHE, AERA, AIR, AAHHE, and TACHE. He has also served on the national boards of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education, the National Resource Center for the First Year Experience, the Hispanic Scholarship Consortium, and the Texas Puente Project (Catch the Next). Locally he serves on the UT Elementary School Management Board, the Ann Richards School Foundation Board, and the Texas Lyceum Board. He is currently the Board Chair of AAHHE, a national association committed to advancing leadership opportunities for the Latinx community in higher education. Dr. Sáenz earned his Ph.D. in Higher Education and Organizational Change in 2005 from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he also completed a Master's in Education in 2002. He also earned a Master's degree in Public Affairs (1999, LBJ School of Public Affairs) and a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics (1996, College of Natural Sciences) from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Sáenz is a fourth-generation Texan and a second-generation Longhorn.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Audrey M Sorrells

Audrey M Sorrells

Associate Dean of Students for Research , New Student Services
+1 512 471 5017, +1 512 475 6547, audrey.sorrells@austin.utexas.edu

[bold]Audrey M. Sorrells, Ph.D.[/bold] is associate dean of students for research in the Office of the Dean of Students, Division of Student Affairs. She is also associate professor of special education in the College of Education, Senior Ford Fellow, National Research Council and past Fellow in the Lee Hage Jamail Regents Chair in Education at The University of Texas at Austin. Prior to her appointment in the Office of the Dean of Students, Dr. Sorrells served as undergraduate advisor and minority liaison officer in the Department of Special Education, as well as chair of several department, college and university committees. She has 27 years of higher education teaching and research experience, from 1987 to 1997 at Southeastern Louisiana University, and since 1997 at UT Austin. Prior to her university appointments, Dr. Sorrells taught in K-12 settings, teaching at risk students and in high poverty rural and urban schools, including students with learning and behavioral disabilities. Dr. Sorrells' research in higher education has focused on the first-year experience, first-generation students, Veteran students with posttraumatic stress, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and substance use disorders, students with disabilities, professional development, and interdisciplinary partnerships in higher education. Other areas on which she has focused her research include minority and disproportionate representation in K-12 schools for students with disabilities, reading instruction in middle and secondary schools, and college readiness. In addition to having authored and coauthored many refereed publications, Dr. Sorrells is a consultant and presenter at local, statewide and national levels, and currently serves as a principal investigator or co-investigator of several state and federally funded grants. She served as co-editor of Journal of Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners and is co-author of the book, Critical Issues in Special Education: Access, Diversity and Accountability. The recipient of many honors, including a Doctoral Leadership Award from the University of Florida, Dr. Sorrells has also been a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, a Dean's Fellow at The University of Texas at Austin and is listed in Who's Who Among Educators in America. Dr. Sorrells earned a Bachelor of Arts in business administration and education and Master of Education degree in special education from Southeastern Louisiana University. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree in education from the University of Florida.

Luis  Urrieta

Luis Urrieta


+1 512 232 4129, urrieta@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Dr. Luis Urrieta, Jr. is Professor of Cultural Studies in Education. He is (by courtesy) affiliated faculty in the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS), the Native American & Indigenous Studies Program (NAIS), and the Lozano Long-Benson Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS). Dr. Urrieta's research interests center around 1) cultural and racial identities, 2) agency as social and cultural practices, 3) social movements and collective action related to education, and 4) learning in family and community contexts. He is specifically interested in Chicanx, Latinx, and Indigenous (P'urhépecha) cultures and identities, activism as a social practice in educational spaces, in oral and narrative traditions in qualitative research, and Indigenous knowledge systems and research methodologies. Luis Urrieta received his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003. He has been a resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, New Mexico; a Fulbright Garcia Robles Fellow in Mexico; a fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the Spencer Foundation, and the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education. Dr. Urrieta held the Lee Hage Jamail Regents Chair in Education from 2006 to 2008, and currently holds the Suzanne B. and John L. Adams Professorship in Education. In 2012 he was honored with the Alumni Achievement Award from the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Urrieta is the author of the award winning book, "Working from Within: Chicana and Chicano Activist Educators in Whitestream Schools" (2009, University of Arizona Press), in addition to an extensive publishing record. Hi most recent book is a co-edited volume (with George W. Noblit) titled Cultural Constructions of Identity: Meta-ethnography and Theory (2018, Oxford University Press). Dr. Urrieta was also honored as a César E. Chávez champion of change by the White House in 2014.

Angela  Valenzuela

Angela Valenzuela

Professor , Department of Educational Leadership and Policy , College of Education
+1 512 232 6008, valenz@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Angela Valenzuela is a professor in both the Educational Policy and Planning Program within the Department of Educational Administration at the University of Texas at Austin and holds a courtesy appointment in the Cultural Studies in Education Program within the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. She also serves as the director of the University of Texas Center for Education Policy. A Stanford University graduate, her previous teaching positions were in Sociology at Rice University in Houston, Texas (1990-98), as well as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Houston (1998-99). She is also the author of award-winning Subtractive Schooling: U.S. Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring (1999) Leaving Children Behind: How "Texas-style" Accountability Fails Latino Youth (2005), and Growing Critically Conscious Teachers: A Social Justice Curriculum for Educators of Latino/a Youth (Teachers College Press, 2016). She also founded and operates an education blog titled, Educational Equity, Politics, and Policy in Texas. She served as co-editor of the Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, as well as the Anthropology and Education Quarterly. A previous Fulbright Scholar, Valenzuela spent her 2007-08 academic year in Mexico where she taught in the College of Law at the University of Guanajuato in Guanajuato, Guanajuato and conducted research in the areas of immigration, human rights, and binational relations. Most recently, she was honored to have been selected to be a scholar in residence in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Valenzuela's research and teaching interests are in the sociology of education, minority youth in schools, educational policy, urban education reform, culturally relevant curriculum, Ethnic Studies, and indigenous education. Valenzuela also directs the National Latino Education Research and Policy Project (NLERAP) that aims to create a teacher education pathways for Latino/a youth, nationally. With prior funding support from grants from both the Ford and Kellogg Foundations, this work builds on the efforts and advocacy of Latino/a education and business leaders nationwide. NLERAP has been housed at the University of Texas at Austin since November 6, 2009. Locally, she directs Academia Cuauhtli, a partnership-based, community-anchored Saturday school with district-wide Impacts in Austin, Texas.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Equality


James K Galbraith

James K Galbraith

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 1244, galbraith@mail.utexas.edu

James Galbraith holds the Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/ Business Relations, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, where he teaches economics and a variety of other subjects, and a professorship in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He served on the staff of the U.S. Congress, including as Executive Director of the Joint Economic Committee in 1981-82. Dr. Galbraith is a senior scholar of the Levy Economics Institute, chair of the Board of Economists for Peace and Security, a global professional network, and a managing editor of Structural Change and Economic Dynamics. He directs the University of Texas Inequality Project, an informal research group based at the LBJ School. He is a member of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (elected, 2010), and was President of the Association for Evolutionary Economics in 2012. In addition to numerous articles, book chapters and various scholarly works, Dr. Galbraith published books on economic policy and inequality, including "Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe," (2016); "Inequality: What Everyone Needs to Know" (2016); "The End of Normal: The Great Crisis and the Future of Growth" (2014); "Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis" (2012); "Galbraith: The Affluent Society & Other Writings 1952-1967" (2010); "The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too" (2008), Created Unequal (1998) and Balancing Acts: Technology, Finance and the American Future, (1989). He has co-authored two textbooks, "The Economic Problem" with Robert L. Heilbroner and "Macroeconomics " with William Darity Jr.. The work of the University of Texas Inequality Project may be found at http://utip.lbj.utexas.edu

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Peniel E Joseph

Peniel E Joseph

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 475 7241, peniel.joseph@austin.utexas.edu

Joseph’s research focuses has been on “Black Power Studies”, which explore the interdisciplinary fields of Africana studies, women’s and ethnic studies, law and society and political science. He is currently teaching “The Civil Rights Movement and Public Policy”.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Juliet E Walker

Juliet E Walker

Professor Emeritus , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
, jekwalker@austin.utexas.edu

Juliet Walker's teaching fields include African American history, Antebellum Slavery, Black Business History and Political Economy, Black Intellectual history and African American Women's history. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships and twelve publication awards for her books and articles. Also, she was awarded the Business History Conference Lifetime Achievement Award and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History's Carter G. Woodson Scholar Medallion. Dr. Walker is also the founding director of the Center of Black Business History, Entrepreneurship, and Technology. Her scholarship has provided the foundation for recognizing black business history as a subfield in African American history. She is author of "The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship" (1998), the first comprehensive book on black business history. Her book "Free Frank: A Black Pioneer on the Antebellum Frontier" (1983) details entrepreneurial activities of slave-born Frank (1777–1854). Walker's research enabled the town site, New Philadelphia, Illinois, to be named a National Historic Landmark. She is also the editor of the "Encyclopedia of African American Business History" (1999) and the author of over ninety articles and scholarly essays. Among other projects, she is currently working on her book titled "Oprah Winfrey: An American Entrepreneur" which will be published by Harvard Business School Press.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Health & Mental Health


Jacqueline L Angel

Jacqueline L Angel

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 2956, jangel@austin.utexas.edu

Jacqueline L. Angel is Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her Ph.D. from Rutgers University in 1989 and post-doctoral training at Rutgers in mental health services research and the Pennsylvania State University Program in Demography of Aging. Her research focuses on issues at the intersection of family, health and aging. She is particularly interested in evaluating the impact of policies on the health and well-being of Latinos, immigrants, and other vulnerable groups, and how cultural heterogeneity among the elderly affects the design of programs for the cost-effective delivery of health services. Dr. Angel is a co-investigator on an NIH/National Institute on Aging funded benchmark study of the longitudinal health of older Mexican Americans in the Southwestern United States. Since the inception of the project, she has assessed the impact of nativity and the migration process on health outcomes, and examined their implications for family living arrangements and long term care policy. She is currently developing a research agenda that focuses on the role of civil society and non-governmental organizations on the care of low-income elderly in the United States and Latin America.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Kevin O Cokley

Kevin O Cokley

Department Chair , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
+1 512 471 7498, kcokley@austin.utexas.edu

Kevin Cokley's research can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial and ethnic identity development, academic motivation and academic achievement. A theme of much of his research is understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Cokley's research and scholarship have led him to challenge the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and to critically re-examine the impact of racial and ethnic identity and gender on academic achievement. Recently Cokley has started exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes among ethnic minority students. Cokley's publications have appeared in professional journals such as the Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Black Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Individual Differences and Personality, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and the Harvard Educational Review. Cokley has a joint appointment in the College of Education's Department of Educational Psychology and the College of Liberal Arts' Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the Past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology and the Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets including the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, The Conversation and The Hill on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, police shootings of Blacks, the aftermath of Ferguson, the use of school vouchers, racial disparities in school discipline, and Black students’ graduation rates. [italic]Kevin Cokley is not currently accepting new graduate students for the 2022-23 Academic Year.[/italic]

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Catherine  Cubbin

Catherine Cubbin

Associate Dean for Research , School of Social Work
+1 512 232 0625, ccubbin@austin.utexas.edu

Catherine Cubbin is professor and associate dean for research in the Steve Hicks School of Social Work, and a faculty research associate at the Population Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin. Cubbin uses epidemiological methods to better understand socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequalities in health for the purpose of informing policy. Specific areas of her research include investigating how neighborhood environments may explain social inequalities in health, and the measurement of socioeconomic status in studies of racial/ethnic disparities in health. Using national and statewide representative data sets, she has studied social inequalities in injuries, cardiovascular disease, health behaviors, mortality, and maternal, infant, and adolescent health.

Media Contact: Andrea Campetella, campetella@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-1458

Delida  Sanchez

Delida Sanchez

Associate Professor , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
+1 512 471 0368, delida.sanchez@austin.utexas.edu

Delida Sanchez is interested in teaching and research in the area of multicultural counseling. In addition to exploring ethnic and racial identity development, she focuses on racism and health disparities in behavioral and mental health among Black and Latino populations. Sanchez’s teaching encompasses the development of cultural competencies for working with racial, ethnic, gender and sexual minorities.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Debra J Umberson

Debra J Umberson

Professor , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 6330, umberson@prc.utexas.edu

Debra Umberson is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Umberson's research focuses on social factors that influence population health with a particular emphasis on aging and life course change, marital and family ties, and gender and racial variation in health disparities. Her recent publications have focused on marital transitions and body weight; stress and health behavior; gender and health in gay, lesbian, and straight couples; race, social ties, and disadvantage in health; and health policy addressing the link between social ties and health. She has been the recipient of a National Research Service Award and a FIRST Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Umberson is also an elected Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. Her current research, supported by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator in Health Policy Research Award and the National Institute on Aging, examines how marital relationships affect health-related behavior and health care, and how those processes vary across gay, lesbian, and heterosexual unions. She is the immediate past editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior and Chair-elect of the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. She is also the recipient of the 2015 Matilda White Riley Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association's Section on Aging and the Life Course.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Fatima A Varner

Fatima A Varner

Assistant Professor , Department of Human Development and Family Sciences , College of Natural Sciences
+1 512 471 8580, fvarner@utexas.edu

Fatima Varner's major research interests include the roles of ethnicity, gender, and context on parenting, family processes, and adolescent outcomes. She is especially interested in the pathways through which racial discrimination influences parenting and adolescents’ academic achievement in African American families. In addition, she studies how contextual factors influence African American mothers’ psychological well-being.

Media Contact: Christine Sinatra, christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-4641

History, Anthropology & Sociology


Deborah A Bolnick

Deborah A Bolnick

Research Affiliate - Sr Research Fellow , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 2781, +1 512 471 7532, deborah.bolnick@austin.utexas.edu

Deborah Bolnick's research focuses on human genetic variation and how it is shaped by culture, language, history, and geography. She uses both ancient and modern DNA to reconstruct Native American prehistory. She is also interested in genetic ancestry testing and how it affects our understanding of race and ethnicity. Bolnick uses recent advances in molecular genetics to investigate the evolutionary history and biological diversity of human populations. In her research, she considers genomic data in conjunction with other lines of anthropological and biological evidence.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Simone Browne

Simone Browne

Associate Professor , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 5975, sbrowne@austin.utexas.edu

Simone Browne teaches and researches surveillance studies, digital media and black diaspora studies. Her first book, Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness (Duke University Press, 2015) examines surveillance with a focus on transatlantic slavery, biometric technologies, branding, airports and creative texts. Simone is an Executive Board member of HASTAC. She is also a part of Deep Lab, a feminist arts and research collective.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Kevin O Cokley

Kevin O Cokley

Department Chair , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
+1 512 471 7498, kcokley@austin.utexas.edu

Kevin Cokley's research can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial and ethnic identity development, academic motivation and academic achievement. A theme of much of his research is understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Cokley's research and scholarship have led him to challenge the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and to critically re-examine the impact of racial and ethnic identity and gender on academic achievement. Recently Cokley has started exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes among ethnic minority students. Cokley's publications have appeared in professional journals such as the Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Black Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Individual Differences and Personality, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and the Harvard Educational Review. Cokley has a joint appointment in the College of Education's Department of Educational Psychology and the College of Liberal Arts' Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the Past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology and the Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets including the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, The Conversation and The Hill on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, police shootings of Blacks, the aftermath of Ferguson, the use of school vouchers, racial disparities in school discipline, and Black students’ graduation rates. [italic]Kevin Cokley is not currently accepting new graduate students for the 2022-23 Academic Year.[/italic]

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Laurie B Green

Laurie B Green

Associate Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 736 1002, lbgreen@austin.utexas.edu

Dr. Green's central research areas include the politics of race and gender in the twentieth-century U.S.; social movements; and cultural studies. She teaches modern U.S. history, with concentrations on women and gender in twentieth-century America, the Civil Rights Movement, the South, African-American history and comparative race and ethnicity. She earned the 2008 Philip Taft Labor History Book Prize for her book "Battling the 'Plantation Mentality': Race, Gender and Freedom in Memphis during the Civil Rights Era" (2007). The book was also a finalist for the 2008 OAH Liberty Legacy Award.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

John  Hartigan

John Hartigan

Director Academic Center , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 9201, johnhartigan@austin.utexas.edu

John Hartigan examines the rhetorical maze of racial discourse in contemporary American culture. His current project, "Care of the Species: Cultivating Biodiversity in Mexico and Spain," stems from the idea of how "race" is used similarly on plants and people (such as, races of corn). Just as “indigenous” first referred to plants and later to people, so too has the concept of race shifted historically from applying to nonhumans and then humans. Hartigan analyzes how breeders, horticulturalists, and geneticists posit forms of parallels between humans and maize, in order to develop a new analytical perspective on racial thinking broadly. His research interests include anthropology of science (comparative study of genomics research in the United States and Mexico); ethnography of race (theories, methods, and practice, with an attention to cultural articulations of whiteness); American culture (class and racial discourses, along with questions of cultural form in the U.S. public sphere).

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Minkah  Makalani

Minkah Makalani

Director , John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies
+1 512 471 4745, makalani@austin.utexas.edu

Minkah Makalani is Director for the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies, and Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. His work and teaching focus on intellectual history, black political thought, radical social movements, Caribbean independence, Black Power, race and racial identity, and hip-hop. His first book, In the Cause of Freedom: Radical Black Internationalism from Harlem to London, 1917-1939 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011), examines the black radical encounter within organized Marxism among early twentieth century Caribbean radicals in Harlem and London, and considers how these activist-intellectuals drew on their experiences of racial oppression, colonial domination, and diasporic interactions prompted their independent political organizing and informed their engagement with western radical thought to articulate a black internationalist politics. He is also co-editor of Escape from New York: The New Negro Renaissance beyond Harlem (University Press of Minnesota, 2013), with Davarian Baldwin. His articles have appeared in Small Axe, Social Text, South Atlantic Quarterly, Souls, The Journal of African American History, and Women, Gender, and Families of Color.

Alberto A Martinez

Alberto A Martinez

Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
, almartinez@austin.utexas.edu

Alberto Martinez is originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico. His research interests include history of mathematics and physics, especially the origins of Einstein's special theory of relativity, as well as the works of Giordano Bruno and Galileo. He is the author of "The Cult of Pythagoras "(University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012), on the evolution of myths in the history of mathematics. He is also the author of "Science Secrets: The Truth About Darwin's Finches, Einstein's Wife, and Other Myths" (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). And previously, he published "Kinematics: The Lost Origins of Einstein's Relativity" (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), and "Negative Math" (Princeton University Press, 2005). His new book, "Bruno, Galileo & the Inquisition" is forthcoming in June 2018 from Reaktion Books. Based on articles he wrote about the 2016 Presidential Election, Martinez is also writing a book about the political news media, "The Media Versus the Devil Mr. Trump."

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Martha  Menchaca

Martha Menchaca

Professor , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 7537, mmen@austin.utexas.edu

Martha Menchaca studies social anthropology, ethnicity, gender, oral history and oral traditions, legal anthropology and Mexican immigration.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Leonard N Moore

Leonard N Moore

Executive Director, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)
+1 512 471 3212, leonardmoore@mail.utexas.edu

Leonard N. Moore is professor of history specializing in Modern African American History; black urban history; intersection of race, sport, and hip-hop. He is currently serving also as the Senior Associate Vice-President for Campus Diversity and the Interim Deputy Director for Minority Recruitment. His books include "Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power in America" and "Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina" (2010). He is currently working on another book project, titled "God’s Trombone: The Life of Adam Clayton Powell". In addition to his academic and administrative work, Dr. Moore spends a great deal of time helping high-profile athletic programs across the country implement strategic diversity initiatives that help student-athletes excel both in the classroom and on the field. Dr. Moore is highly active in initiating and executing programs for retaining and increasing diversity. His professional service in Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence include programs, such as Summer Bridge Program, Gateway Program, Ace Program, GradPrep Program UTransition Program, Longhorn Link Program, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program, Intellectual Entrepreneurship Minority Male Initiative among others.

Marcelo  Paixao

Marcelo Paixao

Associate Professor , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
, marcelopaixao@utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Marcelo Jorge de Paula Paixão studies race relations and inequalities in Brazil and Latin American. He makes sense of statistics of race, ethnic, and gender inequality by investigating public policies issues, models of socioeconomic development and the labor market. He is in the process of writing his ninth book, titled "Quinientos años de soledad: estúdios sobre las desigualdades raciales en Brasil," published by the Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Kelly  Raley

Kelly Raley

Professor , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 6333, kelly.raley@austin.utexas.edu

R. Kelly Raley is Christine and Stanley E. Adams, Jr. Centennial Professor of Liberal Arts in the Department of Sociology and Faculty Research Associate in Population Research Center. She is also editor of the Journal of Marriage and Family. Her research investigates family trends, the social determinants of family formation, and the impact of family change on social stratification. As part of a larger agenda examining the economic, social, and cultural contributors to marriage disparities in the United States, she has recently completed a project investigating the influence of occupational characteristics on the transition into marriage in early adulthood. Much of her work in this area has addressed racial and ethnic differences in marriage and cohabitation, but her current line of inquiry focuses on educational variation in family formation.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Cherise  Smith

Cherise Smith

Associate Professor of Art and Art History and of African and African Diaspora Studies , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 1784, cherise_smith@austin.utexas.edu

Cherise Smith specializes in American art after 1945, especially as it intersects with the politics of identity, race, and gender. Her book, "Enacting Others: Politics of Identity in Eleanor Antin, Nikki S. Lee, Adrian Piper, and Anna Deavere Smith" (2011), examines how identity is negotiated in performance art in which women artists take-on the characteristics and manners of a racial, ethnic, and gender “other”. Her articles have appeared in Art Journal, African Arts, and exposure among other venues. She was awarded the Getty Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship, and a Research Fellowship at W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African American Research at Harvard University. She has worked in the curatorial departments of the Art Institute of Chicago, the De Young Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum among others institutions.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Circe D Sturm

Circe D Sturm

Professor , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 1561, circe@austin.utexas.edu

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Eric  Tang

Eric Tang

Director, Center for Asian American Studies , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
, erictang@austin.utexas.edu

Eric Tang is an Associate Professor in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and faculty member in the Center for Asian American Studies. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Sociology and serves as a faculty fellow with both the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis and the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement. His first book, "Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto" (Temple University Press, 2015), is an ethnographic account of refugee life in some of New York City’s most impoverished and socially marginalized neighborhoods. A former community organizer, Tang has published several articles on race and urban social movements, including award-winning writing on post-Katrina New Orleans. He is at work on a second book, Fire In the Streets (Verso Books, 2018), which revisits the urban rebellions of the late-1960s. Locally, Tang’s research focuses on the past and present of racial segregation in Austin, Texas, paying particular attention the gentrification-driven displacements of the city’s longstanding African American residents. He co-authored the report “Outlier: The Case of Austin’s Declining African American population” which revealed that Austin was the only major growing city in the United States to experience an absolute numerical decline in African Americans.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Shirley E Thompson

Shirley E Thompson

Associate Professor , Department of American Studies , College of Liberal Arts
, s.thompson@austin.utexas.edu

Professor Thompson is Associate Professor of American Studies. She currently serves as the Associate Director of the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies. She is currently researching a book project entitled "No More Auction Block for Me: African Americans and the Problem of Property" which traces out some of the legacies of slavery for African American encounters with property and ownership. Specifically, it explores the interwoven concepts of race and property value from the vantage point of African American historical memory, political economy, and expressive culture. Situated at the intersection of legal and economic discourses, the notion of property also finds expression in literature and performance, material and expressive cultures. Thus, the project draws on the methodologies of cultural history, literary criticism, performance studies, ethnography, and critical theory. Her first book, Exiles at Home: The Struggle to Become American in Creole New Orleans is a cultural history of New Orleans' French-speaking free people of color over the middle decades of the nineteenth century. The dissertation on which it is based was awarded the Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize by the American Studies Association in 2001.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Juliet E Walker

Juliet E Walker

Professor Emeritus , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
, jekwalker@austin.utexas.edu

Juliet Walker's teaching fields include African American history, Antebellum Slavery, Black Business History and Political Economy, Black Intellectual history and African American Women's history. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships and twelve publication awards for her books and articles. Also, she was awarded the Business History Conference Lifetime Achievement Award and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History's Carter G. Woodson Scholar Medallion. Dr. Walker is also the founding director of the Center of Black Business History, Entrepreneurship, and Technology. Her scholarship has provided the foundation for recognizing black business history as a subfield in African American history. She is author of "The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship" (1998), the first comprehensive book on black business history. Her book "Free Frank: A Black Pioneer on the Antebellum Frontier" (1983) details entrepreneurial activities of slave-born Frank (1777–1854). Walker's research enabled the town site, New Philadelphia, Illinois, to be named a National Historic Landmark. She is also the editor of the "Encyclopedia of African American Business History" (1999) and the author of over ninety articles and scholarly essays. Among other projects, she is currently working on her book titled "Oprah Winfrey: An American Entrepreneur" which will be published by Harvard Business School Press.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Immigration


Ricardo C Ainslie

Ricardo C Ainslie

M. K. Hage Centennial Professor in Education , Counseling Psychology , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
+1 512 471 0364, +1 512 471 4407, rainslie@austin.utexas.edu

Ricardo Ainslie explores the intersection of psychology and culture through such topics as the psychological experience of immigration, ethnic conflicts within communities, and the relationship between individual and collective identity. He pursues these topics primarily through the descriptive methodology of qualitative inquiry. Additionally, Ainslie examines these matters through books, documentary films, and photographic exhibits. Drawing from the fields of anthropology, creative non-fiction, and the liberal arts, Ainslie has generated a hybrid methodology of ‘psychoanalytic ethnography’ based on in-depth interviews of profoundly psychological character. His extensive work in Texas and Mexico propelled his inquiry into how communities function and transform in response to significant conflict. Ainslie is particularly interested in investigating how individuals and broader cultural groups experience life within these affected communities. Ainslie’s multidisciplinary and integrative sensibility is evident in his extensive involvement throughout the University of Texas at Austin, where he is professionally affiliated with the American Studies Program, the Center for Mexican American Studies, and the Lozano-Long Institute for Latin American Studies. He is the M. K. Hage Centennial Professor in Education, was recently a Fellow in the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and taught at Houston's Center for Psychoanalytic Studies for seven years.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Victoria M Defrancesco

Victoria M Defrancesco

Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
, vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

Victoria M. DeFrancesco Soto's is interested in US politics and its implications for countries abroad. Her research analyzes how human thought and emotion shape political behavior. Her academic work focuses on: campaigns and elections, political marketing, women in politics, race and ethnic politics, and immigration. Her research projects examine the influence of social group identities (e.g. race, gender, ethnicity, religion, partisanship) on political behavior. examining the growth of the Latino population and how this demographic shift will affect the United States along social, political, and economic dimensions. This book project looks at the historical role of immigrants and focuses on what elements make Latino immigrants unique and different from past immigration waves and how this will affect the future of the nation. Her second current research project looks at the role of women in politics. In particular, she examines how women of color navigate the intersection of partisanship and ethnicity. With the recent rise of elected Republican women of color (e.g. Governors Susana Martinez and Nikki Haley) Victoria considers how women can shape their party’s rhetoric and platforms. She works to translate social science research into a more relatable form of information for a wide variety of audiences. She is a contributor to MSNBC and NBCNews.com as well as a regular political analyst for Telemundo. She also has previously provided on-air analysis for CNN, Fox, PBS, Univision, and NPR.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Gary P Freeman

Gary P Freeman

Professor Emeritus , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
, gfreeman@austin.utexas.edu

Gary Freeman specializes in the politics of immigration, comparative social policy, and politics in western democracies. He is currently editing a Handbook on Migration and Social Policy (Elgar, 2016). He has published four books, Immigrant Labor and Racial Conflict in Industrial Societies (1979), Nations of Immigrants: Australia, the United States, and International Migration (1992)(edited with James Jupp), Immigration and Security (2009)(edited with Terri Givens, and David Leal), Immigration and Public Opinion (2013)(edited with Randall Hansen and David Leal). He is the author most recently of “Comparative Analysis of Immigration Politics: A Retrospective.” American Behavioral Scientist, “Can Comprehensive Immigration Policy be both Liberal and Democratic?” Society, “Immigration, Diversity, and Welfare Chauvinism.” Forum (2009), “Pointless: On the Failure to Adopt an Immigration Points System in the United States,” (Gary P. Freeman, David Leal, and Jake Onyett) in Phil Triadafilopoulos, ed., Wanted and Welcome? Policies for Highly Skilled Immigrants in Comparative Perspective (2013), “Migration and the Political Economy of the Welfare State: Thirty Years Later.” In Grete Brochmann and Elena Jurado, eds. Europe’s Immigration Challenge: Reconciling Work, Welfare and Mobility (2013). “Interest Group Politics and Immigration Policy.” (Gary P. Freeman and Stuart M. Tendler). In Daniel Tichenor and Marc Rosenblum, eds. Oxford Handbook on the Politics of International Migration (2012).

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Denise L Gilman

Denise L Gilman

Clinical Professor , School of Law
+1 512 232 7796, dgilman@law.utexas.edu

Gilman can address immigration law, immigrant rights and family detention.

Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

Su Yeong  Kim

Su Yeong Kim

Professor , Department of Human Development and Family Sciences , College of Natural Sciences
+1 512 471 5524, +1 512 475 6014, su.yeong.kim@utexas.edu

Kim focuses on how culturally specific factors, such as acculturation and language brokering, influence the development and well-being of children in immigrant families. Su Yeong Kim, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. She studies the intersection of family and cultural contexts in understanding the development of children of immigrants in the United States, with a focus on children of Chinese and Mexico-origin. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. She examines how culturally relevant developmental processes (acculturation) and stressors (physiological, culture-specific) directly, indirectly, or interactively show stability, change, or growth to shape parent-child relationships (parenting, tiger parenting, father-child relationships) and adjustment transitions and outcomes (academic achievement, depressive symptoms) among minority adolescents and young adults. She also develops and tests the measurement invariance of culturally relevant measures for use with ethnic minorities. For example, she developed measures of language brokering to capture the subjective experiences of adolescents translating for monolingual, immigrant parents with limited English skills. Her research has revealed that the commonly held perception of Asian American parents as “tiger parents” being responsible for producing child prodigies is inaccurate. In fact, her eight year longitudinal study of Chinese American families demonstrate supportive parenting as the most common type of parenting leading to the most optimal outcomes in terms of both academic and socio-emotional adjustment in Chinese American adolescents. Her studies on language brokering among Mexican American adolescents reveals that children experience both a sense of burden and efficacy in translating for their non-English fluent, Spanish-speaking parents, and that their perceptions of the language brokering experience relate directly to their socio-emotional adjustment.

Media Contact: Christine Sinatra, christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-4641

Martha  Menchaca

Martha Menchaca

Professor , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 7537, mmen@austin.utexas.edu

Martha Menchaca studies social anthropology, ethnicity, gender, oral history and oral traditions, legal anthropology and Mexican immigration.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Sharmila  Rudrappa

Sharmila Rudrappa

Director of South Asia Institute , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 6310, rudrappa@austin.utexas.edu

Sharmila Rudrappa, a South-Asian-American Studies Scholar, is also a sociologist who specializes in gender and immigration issues. Her book, Ethnic Routes to Becoming American: Indian Immigrants and the Cultures of Citizenship (Rutgers University Press, 2004), is an ethnography of a shelter for battered South Asian American women, and a cultural organization in Chicago. The book contextualizes immigrant race politics within the larger cultural turn we see in the sphere of American politics in the late 20th century. A companion article, "Radical Caring In An Ethnic Shelter: South Asian American Women Workers At Apna Ghar, Chicago," was recently published in Gender and Society. At present, Dr. Rudrappa is working on how globalization affects the social rights of citizenship. Her project is tentatively titled "Techno-Braceros, Indian Mothers and Other Such Phenomena: Conceiving Citizenship in 21st Century United States." She was in India during the summer 2003 conducting preliminary research for the project. She was a recipient of the Humanities Institute Fellowship for the fall 2003.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Sam C Vong

Sam C Vong

Assistant Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 4073, svong@austin.utexas.edu

A twentieth-century United States historian with specializations in Asian American history, international migration and refugee studies, and comparative race and ethnicity, he is also trained in the history of modern Southeast Asia. Dr. Vong's current research investigates the transnational politics of compassion that surrounded the migration and settlement of refugees and immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos from the late 1960s to the early 1990s.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Ruth E Wasem

Ruth E Wasem

Clinical Professor of Policy Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 9883, wasemruth@utexas.edu

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Justice and Law Enforcement


Joseph R Fishkin

Joseph R Fishkin

Professor , School of Law
+1 512 232 1813, jfishkin@law.utexas.edu

Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

Jennifer E Laurin

Jennifer E Laurin

Professor , School of Law
+1 512 232 3627, jlaurin@law.utexas.edu

Laurin's principal research interests lie in the intersections of criminal and constitutional litigation, and regulation of criminal justice institutions.

Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

Policy & Politics


Victoria M Defrancesco

Victoria M Defrancesco

Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
, vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

Victoria M. DeFrancesco Soto's is interested in US politics and its implications for countries abroad. Her research analyzes how human thought and emotion shape political behavior. Her academic work focuses on: campaigns and elections, political marketing, women in politics, race and ethnic politics, and immigration. Her research projects examine the influence of social group identities (e.g. race, gender, ethnicity, religion, partisanship) on political behavior. examining the growth of the Latino population and how this demographic shift will affect the United States along social, political, and economic dimensions. This book project looks at the historical role of immigrants and focuses on what elements make Latino immigrants unique and different from past immigration waves and how this will affect the future of the nation. Her second current research project looks at the role of women in politics. In particular, she examines how women of color navigate the intersection of partisanship and ethnicity. With the recent rise of elected Republican women of color (e.g. Governors Susana Martinez and Nikki Haley) Victoria considers how women can shape their party’s rhetoric and platforms. She works to translate social science research into a more relatable form of information for a wide variety of audiences. She is a contributor to MSNBC and NBCNews.com as well as a regular political analyst for Telemundo. She also has previously provided on-air analysis for CNN, Fox, PBS, Univision, and NPR.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Edwin  Dorn

Edwin Dorn

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 232 4007, eddorn@utexas.edu

Ed Dorn became Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs in September 1997, after spending 20 years in Washington shaping and studying public policy. His last Washington job was at the Pentagon, where he served from 1993 to 1997, initially as an Assistant Secretary and later as an Under Secretary of Defense. Mr. Dorn also worked at the US Education Department and at two "think tanks"--the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the Brookings Institution. His first position in Washington, in 1977, was as a special assistant to the then-Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Joseph Califano. As Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, Mr. Dorn's policy responsibilities included recruiting, training, pay and benefits for the total force of more than three million military and civilian personnel. He also oversaw the Defense Health Program, the Commissary System, Overseas Dependent Schools and the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute. A native Texan, Mr. Dorn is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of UT-Austin. In 1967-68, he was a Fulbright Scholar at the Center for West African Studies at the University of Birmingham, England. He completed an M.A. in African studies at the University of Indiana-Bloomington and a Ph.D. in political science at Yale. From 1970-72, he served on active duty with the US Army in Germany. Mr. Dorn's major publications include "Rules and Racial Equality" (Yale, 1979) and an edited volume, "Who Defends America?" (Joint Center, 1989). He has been an advisor to two PBS-TV Series: "Congress: We The People" and the civil rights documentary "Eyes on the Prize." His affiliations include the Institute for Defense Analyses, the Kettering Foundation and the United Way/Capital Area. In 1999, Dorn was named a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Texas at Austin.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Angela M Evans

Angela M Evans

Dean , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
, dean.a.evans@austin.utexas.edu

Angela Evans is the Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs, the J. J. "Jake" Pickle Regents Chair in Public Affairs and a clinical professor of public policy practice. In her last post, during her career of more than 40 years working with members of congress, she served as Deputy Director of the Congressional Research Service — the agency created by the U.S. Congress to serve as its primary source of policy research and analysis. Her research focuses on the exchange of information between researchers and policymakers.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Peniel E Joseph

Peniel E Joseph

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 475 7241, peniel.joseph@austin.utexas.edu

Joseph’s research focuses has been on “Black Power Studies”, which explore the interdisciplinary fields of Africana studies, women’s and ethnic studies, law and society and political science. He is currently teaching “The Civil Rights Movement and Public Policy”.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

David L Leal

David L Leal

Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 1343, dleal@austin.utexas.edu

David Leal's primary academic interests are Latino politics and policy. His Latino politics research spans the fields of political behavior, public policy, and public opinion. His work also work incorporates insights from disciplines such as sociology, economics, ethnic studies, and religious studies. His research has also focused on how religion shapes political engagement, the political participation of non-citizens, the complexities of ethnic identity, and how veterans engage in politics. He continues to work on questions involving Latino political behavior and opinion, the politics of migration, religion and politics, and the military and society.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Amy H Liu

Amy H Liu

Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 7249, amy.liu@austin.utexas.edu

Amy Liu specializes in issues of ethnic politics, language policies, and international migration, with regional focuses on Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe. Her current work studies Chinese communities in Eastern Europe, including Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, and Serbia. Most recently, she has gone into the field to study Chinese migrant communities in Romania with the support of a 2015-2016 J. William Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award. Her first book, "Standardizing Diversity: The Political Economy of Language Regimes" (2015), as well as a large body of journal articles, examines the political causes, economic consequences, and social implications of language policies.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Eric L Mcdaniel

Eric L Mcdaniel

Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 7268, emcdaniel@austin.utexas.edu

Eric McDaniel specializes in racial and ethnic politics, religion and politics and health policy. His book, "Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches" (2008), examines why Black religious institutions choose to become involved in political matters. Further, he has also examined the role of religious beliefs in shaping political behavior. His work in health policy examines how citizens interpret government involvement in treating health epidemics and how political empowerment can reduce health disparities. His recent publications include "What Kind of Christian Are You?: Religious Ideologies and Political Attitudes." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (forthcoming); “National Pride and the Boundaries of American Citizenship." Journal of Racial and Ethnic Politics (co-authored with McDaniel, Eric, L., Irfan Nooruddin and Allyson Shortle 2016).

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Tasha S Philpot

Tasha S Philpot

Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 3681, +1 512 471 5121, tphilpot@austin.utexas.edu

Tasha Philpot studies African American politics, public opinion and political behavior, political communication, and political parties. Her research examines the consequences of using racial images in political communication. She is also affiliated with the Center for African and African American Studies and the Center for Women's and Gender Studies. Her book, "Race, Republicans, and the Return of the Party of Lincoln" (2007), examines how political parties use racial symbols to reshape their image among the electorate.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Sports


Michael J Cramer

Michael J Cramer

Senior Fellow , Department of Communication Studies , Moody College of Communication
+1 512 471 2430, michael.cramer@austin.utexas.edu

As former president of the Texas Rangers and the Dallas Stars, Cramer is an expert on the business of sports, collective bargaining, mega-stadiums and revenue enhancement. He also has expert insight on sports and its impact on American society and culture. Prior to joining The University of Texas, he was a professor in the Tourism and Sports Management program at NYU.

Media Contact: Natalie England, natalie.england@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-7209

Louis  Harrison

Louis Harrison

Charles H. Spence, Sr. Centennial Professor in Education , Department of Curriculum and Instruction , College of Education
+1 512 232 4785, lharrison@austin.utexas.edu

Dr. Harrison has focused his research on the influences of race related self-schemata and African American racial identity on physical activity choices and performance. The purpose of this line of research is to investigate the factors that influence sport and physical activity participation, and identity developmental patterns of African Americans. Through his research he hopes to gain a deeper understanding of the racial labels ascribed to particular sports and physical activities, and how these labels affect participation, persistence, effort expended, and performance. Additionally, he wishes to investigate ways physical educators and coaches can precipitate changes in the development of self-schemata for sport and physical activities in an effort to erase these racial labels, and broaden the perceived physical activity choices of all students.

Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

Leonard N Moore

Leonard N Moore

Executive Director, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)
+1 512 471 3212, leonardmoore@mail.utexas.edu

Leonard N. Moore is professor of history specializing in Modern African American History; black urban history; intersection of race, sport, and hip-hop. He is currently serving also as the Senior Associate Vice-President for Campus Diversity and the Interim Deputy Director for Minority Recruitment. His books include "Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power in America" and "Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina" (2010). He is currently working on another book project, titled "God’s Trombone: The Life of Adam Clayton Powell". In addition to his academic and administrative work, Dr. Moore spends a great deal of time helping high-profile athletic programs across the country implement strategic diversity initiatives that help student-athletes excel both in the classroom and on the field. Dr. Moore is highly active in initiating and executing programs for retaining and increasing diversity. His professional service in Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence include programs, such as Summer Bridge Program, Gateway Program, Ace Program, GradPrep Program UTransition Program, Longhorn Link Program, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program, Intellectual Entrepreneurship Minority Male Initiative among others.

Daron K Roberts

Daron K Roberts

Founding Director, Center for Sports Leadership and Innovation , Center for Sports of Leadership and Innovation
+1 512 471 2320, daronroberts@utexas.edu

Daron K. Roberts is a former NFL coach and author of, “Call an Audible: Let My Pivot from Harvard Law to NFL Coach Inspire Your Transition” (Greenleaf 2017). “Call an Audible” was named a #1 New Release and Best Seller by Amazon and Sports Illustrated selected the book as one of its “Best Sports Business Books of 2017.” Roberts serves as founding director of the Center for Sports Leadership and Innovation (CSLi) at the University of Texas. He created CSLi in the fall of 2014. The Center is the first university-based institute dedicated to developing leadership and character curricula for high school, collegiate and professional athletes. Roberts is also a lecturer in the Liberal Arts Honors Program and he focuses on issues of leadership and innovation in the sports arena. He also developed a course – A Gameplan for Winning at Life – that he teaches to incoming freshmen student-athletes at the University of Texas. During the course of each academic year, Roberts teaches nearly 300 students. After graduating from Harvard Law School (2007), Roberts served coaching stints with the Kansas City Chiefs, Detroit Lions, West Virginia Mountaineers and Cleveland Browns. He holds a B.A. in Plan II Honors and Government from the University of Texas (2001) and an M.P.P. from Harvard’s Kennedy School (2004). Roberts served as Student Body President during his tenure at the University of Texas. Before entering graduate school, Roberts worked as an aide to Senator Joe Lieberman. In 2010, Daron launched a nonprofit football camp – 4th and 1, Inc. 4th and 1 provides free SAT prep, life skills development and football training to at-risk youth in Michigan, Texas and Florida. The camp has served nearly 500 student-athletes since 2010. The Presidential Leadership Foundation – a joint venture between Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – tabbed Roberts as a Presidential Leadership Scholar for 2015. He was one of 60 members in the inaugural class. Roberts has been featured in ESPN the Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek and Sports Illustrated and is a contributor to Forbes.com. His articles have appeared in The Dallas Morning News, Fortune, Houston Chronicle, and Time. Roberts is the host of an industry-leading podcast – A Tribe Called Yes (available on iTunes and Stitcher).

The Arts


Charles O Anderson

Charles O Anderson

Professor , Department of Theatre and Dance , College of Fine Arts
+1 215 983 6383, charles.o.anderson@austin.utexas.edu

Hailing from Philadelphia, PA, Charles O. Anderson is joining UT Austin's Dept. of Theatre and Dance as a tenured Associate Professor of African American and African Diasporic Dance with a courtesy appointment in the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies. Having received his B.A. in dance from Cornell University and his M.F.A. in choreography from Temple University, Charles is also artistic director of dance theatre X, a critically acclaimed afro-contemporary dance company whe he founded in 2002. In 2007, Charles was the recipient of a prestigious $60,000 Pew Fellowship in the Arts having been recognized for his choreographic achievements nationally and internationally. He has also had the honor of being named one of the ?Top 25 Artists to Watch? in the country by Dance Magazine, and most recently was named one of ?12 Rising Stars in the Academy? by Diverse Issues in Higher Education Magazine. His choreographic work with undergraduate students has twice been nationally showcased at the Kennedy Center through the American College Dance Festival Association and he has also been twice recognized for outstanding achievement in experimental dance theatre by the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. His current choreographic and scholarly research in experimental African Diasporic dance theatre entitled The Parables of Mutants and Madmen Trilogy. Through The Parables Trilogy Anderson is examining the theory of afrofuturism, which is an emergent literary and cultural aesthetic that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, Afrocentricity and magic realism with non-Western cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of people of color, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past. He looks forward to sharing his work with the UT Austin community soon and is honored to be working as part of this vibrant academic community.

Media Contact: Alicia Dietrich, aliciadietrich@utexas.edu, 512-232-3667

Richard R Flores

Richard R Flores

Professor , Department of Mexican American and Latino/a Studies , College of Liberal Arts
, flores@austin.utexas.edu
Spanish Speaker

Richard Flores works in the areas of critical theory, performance studies, semiotics, and historical and cultural anthropology. Prior to graduate school he worked in Houston and San Antonio where he was involved in founding and teaching in schools for undocumented Mexican children. He has extensive experience in the area of curriculum development and international studies, particularly in Latin America and the Middle East. Flores developed the College of Liberal Arts Global Initiative for Education and Leadership, a consortium of UT and partner units aimed at delivering educational and leadership training abroad. Flores is the author of "Remembering the Alamo: Memory, Modernity, and the Master Symbol" (University of Texas Press, 2002), "Los Pastores: History and Performance in the Mexican Shepherd’s Play of South Texas" (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995), editor of Adina De Zavala’s, "History and Legends of the Alamo" (Arte Público Press, 1996). He has published in American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, The Journal of American Folklore, and a recent book chapter in "Latino Cultural Citizenship" published by Beacon Press.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Cherise  Smith

Cherise Smith

Associate Professor of Art and Art History and of African and African Diaspora Studies , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 1784, cherise_smith@austin.utexas.edu

Cherise Smith specializes in American art after 1945, especially as it intersects with the politics of identity, race, and gender. Her book, "Enacting Others: Politics of Identity in Eleanor Antin, Nikki S. Lee, Adrian Piper, and Anna Deavere Smith" (2011), examines how identity is negotiated in performance art in which women artists take-on the characteristics and manners of a racial, ethnic, and gender “other”. Her articles have appeared in Art Journal, African Arts, and exposure among other venues. She was awarded the Getty Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship, and a Research Fellowship at W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African American Research at Harvard University. She has worked in the curatorial departments of the Art Institute of Chicago, the De Young Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum among others institutions.

Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

Craig Watkins

Craig Watkins

Professor , School of Journalism and Media , Moody College of Communication
+1 512 471 4071, +1 512 471 6676, craig.watkins@austin.utexas.edu

S. Craig Watkins' teaching and research interests focus on race, media, youth culture, and hip-hop studies. One dimension of his research, critical media studies, hones in on what he calls the "new urban market" and how it is reshaping American popular culture, media, and everyday life. A second dimension of his research examines youth media behavior and lifestyle trends as well as the underlying sociological currents that shape them. He is the author of "Hip Hop Matters: Politics, Pop Culture and the Struggle for the Soul of a Movement" (Beacon Press 2005) and of "Representing: Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black Cinema" (The University of Chicago Press 1998). In addition to his books Watkins is the author of several articles and book chapters examining the intersections between race, social change, and popular culture. Some of his future projects include a new book on the role of urban culture in America's entertainment economy and culture and research on young people and television.

Media Contact: Natalie England, natalie.england@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-7209

Voting Rights


Sherri R Greenberg

Sherri R Greenberg

Professor of Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 8324, +1 512 656 6592, srgreenberg@austin.utexas.edu

Sherri Greenberg served for 10 years as a member of the Texas House of Representatives, completing her final term in January 2001. In 1999, she was appointed by the Speaker of the House to chair the House Pensions and Investments Committee, which oversees the Texas State Employee Retirement System, state employee health insurance program, Teacher Retirement System, local public employee retirement systems, and regulation of state investments and public securities. After the 1999 legislative session, the Speaker appointed her as chair of the Select Committee on Teacher Health Insurance. Greenberg served two terms on the House Appropriations Committee, which is the House's budget writing committee, and served on the Appropriations Committee's Education and Major Information Systems Subcommittees. Other committee assignments included the House Economic Development Committee and the Welfare-to-Work Committee. Greenberg's professional background is in public finance. She served as the Manager of Capital Finance for the City of Austin from 1985 to 1989, overseeing the City's debt management, capital budgeting, and capital improvement programs. Prior to that she worked as a Public Finance Officer for Standard & Poor's Corporation in New York, where she analyzed and assigned bond ratings to public projects across the country. Greenberg has a B.A. in Government from UT Austin and an M.S. in Public Administration and Policy from the London School of Economics. At the LBJ School she teaches courses in public financial management, policy development, and public administration and management. Her teaching and research interests include public finance and budgeting, Texas state government, local government, health care, education, utilities, transportation, and campaigns and elections.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

For more information, contact: University Communications, Office of the President, 512-471-3151.