2020 Presidential Election


From campaign strategy to policy issues and voter turnout, faculty experts at UT Austin are poised to provide insights for coverage of the presidential election. Topics include:

    If you are seeking expertise on other subjects, please call University Media Relations at 512-471-3151 or consult our general Media Experts Guide.



    Presidential Politics


    Henry W Brands

    Henry W Brands

    Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 471 3261, hwbrands@austin.utexas.edu

    Henry Brands is a scholar of American history, broadly conceived. As a highly prolific writer, Dr Brands has published twenty-eight books, coauthored or edited five others, and published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe, the Atlantic Monthly, the Smithsonian, the National Interest, the American Historical Review, the Journal of American History, the Political Science Quarterly, American History, and many other newspapers, magazines and journals. His writings have received critical and popular acclaim. His books "The First American" and "Traitor to His Class" were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and the Los Angeles Times Prize. Several of his books have been bestsellers. His books and articles cover topics from the 18th century to the 21st, and include works of narrative history, interpretive history, and biography. He examines politics and foreign policy, business and economics, society and culture. He is the author of more than 20 books and is currently writing a biography of Franklin Roosevelt. Dr. Brands is a member of various honorary societies, including the Society of American Historians and the Philosophical Society of Texas. He is a regular guest on national radio and television programs, and is frequently interviewed by the American and foreign press. His writings have been published in several countries and translated into German, French, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Robert M Chesney

    Robert M Chesney

    Associate Dean for Academic Affairs , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1298, rchesney@law.utexas.edu

    Chesney is jointly appointed at the LBJ School and the UT School of Law, where he serves as the associate dean for Academic Affairs. Chesney's scholarship includes the legalities surrounding national and international security policies and the impact of technological and strategic change over time.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    , vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

    Defrancesco can discuss campaign and elections, political marketing, political psychology, immigration, race, ethnicity and gender. She speaks Spanish.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Sherri R Greenberg

    Sherri R Greenberg

    Professor of Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 8324, +1 512 656 6592, srgreenberg@austin.utexas.edu

    Greenberg served as a Texas state representative for ten years, completing her final term in January 2001. Greenberg is an expert on Texas state government, public finance and electronic government.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Donald Kettl

    University Affiliate , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 267 265 6909, kettl@austin.utexas.edu

    Kettl specializes in public management and public policy.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Daron R Shaw

    Daron R Shaw

    Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 7275, dshaw@austin.utexas.edu

    Daron Shaw's research interests include American government, campaigns and elections, political parties, public opinion and voting behavior, and applied survey research. Dr. Shaw’s most recent book is “Campaigns and Elections,” a textbook he co-authored with John Sides, Keena Lipsitz, and Matthew Grossman. He is also the author of two scholarly monographs. The first is “Unconventional Wisdom: Facts and Myths about American Voters” (with Karen Kaufman and John Petrocik), which explores what we know (and don’t know) about voters and voting in the United States. The second is “Race to 270,” which examines Electoral College strategies and resource allocation patterns in U.S. presidential elections from 1988 through 2004. Dr. Shaw has also published numerous articles in professional journals such as the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, Political Behavior, Political Communication, PS: Political Science, Election Law Journal, Party Politics, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research. In addition to his scholarly research, Dr. Shaw served as a strategist during the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections. He is the co-director of the Fox News Poll, one of the principle investigators for the University of Texas-Texas Tribune Poll, and director of the Texas Lyceum Poll. He also serves on the Board of Overseers for the American National Election Study, and is on the Advisory Board for the Annette Strauss Institute. Dr. Shaw was formerly a presidential appointee to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. In 2012, he was named the Frank. C. Erwin, Jr. Chair of State Government.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Jeremi  Suri

    Jeremi Suri

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 475 7242, suri@austin.utexas.edu

    Suri can adress a wide range of topics including foreign policy, immigration, military affairs, young voters, campaign finance, changing role of the presidency and the history of the presidency.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Local and State Election Issues


    Sherri R Greenberg

    Sherri R Greenberg

    Professor of Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 8324, +1 512 656 6592, srgreenberg@austin.utexas.edu

    Greenberg served as a Texas state representative for ten years, completing her final term in January 2001. Greenberg is an expert on Texas state government, public finance and electronic government.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    James R Henson

    James R Henson

    Executive Director of Texas Politics Project , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 471 0090, j.henson@austin.utexas.edu

    James Henson teaches in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin and directs the Texas Politics Project, a collection of enterprises designed to encourage informed interest and engagement in Texas politics and government. In that role, he co-directs, with Daron Shaw, the University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll, the only open-access, public, statewide survey of public opinion in Texas. The data sets from those surveys are available in the polling section of the Texas Politics website. He also writes about politics for The Texas Tribune, and is a frequent resource for news media and researchers on Texas politics and government. He also coordinates the Government Department's internship program. Dr. Henson was appointed to the City of Austin Ethics Review Commission in 2009 by the Austin City Council, and served as chairman of the commission from 2010 to 2012. He is currently a member of the advisory board of The Subiendo Academy in the McCombs School of Business at UT-Austin.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    William G Spelman

    William G Spelman

    Professor Emeritus , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    , spelman@mail.utexas.edu

    Spelman is an expert in operations research and evaluation and in local government law, administration and finance. He served on the Austin City Council from 1997 to 2000 and from 2009 to 2015.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Paul J Stekler

    Paul J Stekler

    Professor , Department of Radio-Television-Film , Moody College of Communication
    +1 512 471 6679, paul.stekler@austin.utexas.edu

    Politics, Southern politics, political campaigns, political advertising and how polls affect campaigns and campaign messaging; documentary filmmaking

    Media Contact: Natalie England, natalie.england@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-7209

    Economy


    Olivier  Coibion

    Olivier Coibion

    Professor , Department of Economics , College of Liberal Arts
    , ocoibion@austin.utexas.edu

    Olivier Coibion works on macroeconomic topics, including monetary policy, how agents for their expectations, inflation measurement, and commodity prices. Prior to joining UT Austin, Olivier worked at the International Monetary Fund, the Council of Economic Advisers, and the Brookings Institution. He is also affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Mechele  Dickerson

    Mechele Dickerson

    Professor , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1311, mdickerson@law.utexas.edu

    Dickerson is a nationally recognized bankruptcy law scholar and a global media expert on consumer debt.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    James K Galbraith

    James K Galbraith

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 1244, galbraith@mail.utexas.edu

    James Galbraith holds the Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/ Business Relations, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, where he teaches economics and a variety of other subjects, and a professorship in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He served on the staff of the U.S. Congress, including as Executive Director of the Joint Economic Committee in 1981-82. Dr. Galbraith is a senior scholar of the Levy Economics Institute, chair of the Board of Economists for Peace and Security, a global professional network, and a managing editor of Structural Change and Economic Dynamics. He directs the University of Texas Inequality Project, an informal research group based at the LBJ School. He is a member of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (elected, 2010), and was President of the Association for Evolutionary Economics in 2012. In addition to numerous articles, book chapters and various scholarly works, Dr. Galbraith published books on economic policy and inequality, including "Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe," (2016); "Inequality: What Everyone Needs to Know" (2016); "The End of Normal: The Great Crisis and the Future of Growth" (2014); "Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis" (2012); "Galbraith: The Affluent Society & Other Writings 1952-1967" (2010); "The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too" (2008), Created Unequal (1998) and Balancing Acts: Technology, Finance and the American Future, (1989). He has co-authored two textbooks, "The Economic Problem" with Robert L. Heilbroner and "Macroeconomics " with William Darity Jr.. The work of the University of Texas Inequality Project may be found at http://utip.lbj.utexas.edu

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Michael L Geruso

    Michael L Geruso

    Associate Professor , Department of Economics , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 475 8704, mike.geruso@utexas.edu

    Michael Geruso’s research focuses on developing country health and the regulation of US health insurance markets. In his work on Medicare, he has used publicly available and large-scale administrative datasets to investigate upcoding by physicians and imperfect competition among private Medicare Advantage insurers. His research on sanitation provides the first evidence that that open defecation, practiced by a billion people worldwide, generates large infant mortality externalities. His work has been featured in the New York Times, NPR, and the Economist magazine. His research has been funded by the National Institutes for Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Nathan M Jensen

    Nathan M Jensen

    Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    , natemjensen@austin.utexas.edu

    Nathan Jensen was previously an associate professor in the Department of International Business at George Washington University (2014-2016) and associate professor in the Political Science Department at Washington University in St. Louis (2002-2014). Jensen's recent work focuses on states and local governments trying to promote economic development through the use of financial incentives. He writes critical pieces on the overuse of tax abatements or other government policies that are ineffective and driven by political considerations. Jensen teaches courses and conducts research on government economic development strategies, firm non-market strategies and business-government relations, the politics of oil and natural resources, political risk in emerging markets, trade policy, and international institutions.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Calvin H Johnson

    Calvin H Johnson

    John T. Kipp Chair Emeritus in Corporate and Business Law , School of Law
    , cjohnson@law.utexas.edu

    Federal tax law; constitutional law; accounting; business, economics & labor.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Angela K Littwin

    Angela K Littwin

    Professor , School of Law
    +1 512 232 5561, alittwin@law.utexas.edu

    Littwin studies bankruptcy, consumer, and commercial law from an empirical perspective. Her current research includes studying the attitudes towards bankruptcy among consumers being sued by debt collectors, bankruptcy local legal culture, as well as the relationship between consumer credit and domestic violence (DV).

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Civil Rights


    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    , vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

    Defrancesco can discuss campaign and elections, political marketing, political psychology, immigration, race, ethnicity and gender. She speaks Spanish.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Edwin  Dorn

    Edwin Dorn

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 232 4007, eddorn@utexas.edu

    Dorn served as dean of the LBJ School from 1997 to 2004, and his scholarship interests include defense, civil rights, and education policy. Dorn is currently chairman of the board of the Kettering Foundation and has previously served in the Department of Defense.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Ariel E Dulitzky

    Ariel E Dulitzky

    Clinical Professor , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1256, adulitzky@law.utexas.edu

    Dulitzky is director of the Human Rights Clinic and director of the Latin American Initiative. He is a leading expert in the inter-American human rights system. Dulitzky has published extensively on human rights, the inter-American human rights system, racial discrimination and the rule of law in Latin America. He speaks Spanish.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Peniel E Joseph

    Peniel E Joseph

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 475 7241, peniel.joseph@austin.utexas.edu

    Joseph's research focuses has been on "Black Power Studies", which explores the interdisciplinary fields of Africana studies, women's and ethnic studies, law and society and political science. He is currently teaching "The Civil Rights Movement and Public Policy" and can comment on issues of diveristy and race in the current election cycle.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Eric  Tang

    Eric Tang

    Director, Center for Asian American Studies , African and African Diaspora Studies Department , College of Liberal Arts
    , erictang@austin.utexas.edu

    Eric Tang is an Associate Professor in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and faculty member in the Center for Asian American Studies. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Sociology and serves as a faculty fellow with both the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis and the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement. His first book, "Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto" (Temple University Press, 2015), is an ethnographic account of refugee life in some of New York City’s most impoverished and socially marginalized neighborhoods. A former community organizer, Tang has published several articles on race and urban social movements, including award-winning writing on post-Katrina New Orleans. He is at work on a second book, Fire In the Streets (Verso Books, 2018), which revisits the urban rebellions of the late-1960s. Locally, Tang’s research focuses on the past and present of racial segregation in Austin, Texas, paying particular attention the gentrification-driven displacements of the city’s longstanding African American residents. He co-authored the report “Outlier: The Case of Austin’s Declining African American population” which revealed that Austin was the only major growing city in the United States to experience an absolute numerical decline in African Americans.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Health Care


    Carolyn  Heinrich

    Carolyn Heinrich

    Research Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 3779, cheinrich@austin.utexas.edu

    Heinrich’s research focuses on education, social welfare policy, labor force development, public management and econometric methods for program evaluation. She works directly in her research with the federal government on evaluations of workforce development programs, with states on social welfare and child support programs, and with school districts in the evaluation of educational interventions.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    William M Sage

    William M Sage

    Professor , School of Law
    +1 512 232 7806, bsage@law.utexas.edu

    Sage is an expert in health law, regulatory theory, antitrust, and professional responsibility. 

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Social Policy


    Bethany L Albertson

    Bethany L Albertson

    Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 7276, balberts@austin.utexas.edu

    Bethany Albertson is a political psychologist and her work explores political attitudes and persuasion. Her current research relies on surveys and experiments to examine the effect of religious appeals in American politics and the relationship between emotion and cognition, with a recent focus on the role of anxiety on attitudes towards immigration. She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on topics, such as climate change and its political aspects, political psychology, anxiety, and immigration. She has co-authored a forthcoming book, "Anxious Politics: Democratic Citizenship in a Threatening World," which will be published by Cambridge University Press.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Jacqueline L Angel

    Jacqueline L Angel

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 2956, jangel@austin.utexas.edu

    Angel has published extensively about the sociology of aging and how it is affected by the life course and social policy. She focuses on evaluating the impact of policies on the health and well-being of Latinos, immigrants and other vulnerable groups. She also serves as an adviser to professional committees, nongovernmental organizations and other agencies.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Kevin O Cokley

    Kevin O Cokley

    Department Chair , Department of Educational Psychology , College of Education
    +1 512 471 7498, kcokley@austin.utexas.edu

    Kevin Cokley's research can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial and ethnic identity development, academic motivation and academic achievement. A theme of much of his research is understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Cokley's research and scholarship have led him to challenge the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and to critically re-examine the impact of racial and ethnic identity and gender on academic achievement. Recently Cokley has started exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes among ethnic minority students. Cokley's publications have appeared in professional journals such as the Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Black Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Individual Differences and Personality, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and the Harvard Educational Review. Cokley has a joint appointment in the College of Education's Department of Educational Psychology and the College of Liberal Arts' Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the Past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology and the Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets including the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, The Conversation and The Hill on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, police shootings of Blacks, the aftermath of Ferguson, the use of school vouchers, racial disparities in school discipline, and Black students’ graduation rates. [italic]Kevin Cokley is not currently accepting new graduate students for the 2022-23 Academic Year.[/italic]

    Media Contact: Amanda Karr, amanda.karr@austin.utexas.edu, 3234221739

    Mary  Rose

    Mary Rose

    Professor , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 6336, mrose@austin.utexas.edu

    Mary Rose is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches courses on social science and law as well as social psychology and research methods. Her research examines lay participation in the legal system and perceptions of justice, and she has written on a variety of topics including the effects of jury selection practices on jury representativeness and citizens’ views of justice, jury trial innovations, civil damage awards, and public views of court practices. She is also an investigator on the landmark study of decision making among 50 deliberating juries from Pima County, Arizona. She has served on the editorial boards of Law & Social Inquiry, Law & Society Review and Criminology. She is a former trustee of the Law & Society Association. In 2005, her research on the peremptory challenge was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court decision, Miller-el v. Dretke (Breyer, J., concurring) and her work on punitive damages was cited in the 2008 decision Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Jeremi  Suri

    Jeremi Suri

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 475 7242, suri@austin.utexas.edu

    Suri can adress a wide range of topics including foreign policy, immigration, military affairs, young voters, campaign finance, changing role of the presidency and the history of the presidency.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Criminal Justice


    Michele Y Deitch

    Michele Y Deitch

    Distinguished Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 232 2562, +1 512 296 7212, michele.deitch@austin.utexas.edu

    Deitch is an attorney with more than 25 years of experience working on criminal justice policy issues with state and local government officials, corrections officials, judges and advocates. Most of Deitch's current research focuses onindependent prison oversight and the management of juvenile offenders.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    William R Kelly

    William R Kelly

    Professor , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 4142, wkelly@austin.utexas.edu

    Kelly is a Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Criminology and Criminal Justice Research at the University of Texas at Austin. He has taught and conducted research in criminology and criminal justice for over twenty-five years and has published extensively on a variety of justice matters. Dr. Kelly has considerable experience developing, implementing and evaluating a wide variety of criminal justice programs and policies. Much of his evaluation research has focused on diversion programs, such as problem solving courts and probation interventions, as well as behavioral health programs in the justice system, including substance abuse and mental health service delivery.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Michael  Sierra-Arévalo

    Michael Sierra-Arévalo

    Assistant Professor , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
    , msa@utexas.edu

    Michael Sierra-Arévalo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Sierra-Arévalo's research employs quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate police culture, behavior, and legitimacy. His first book, Peril on Patrol: Danger, Death, and U.S. Policing, is under advance contract at Columbia University Press. Drawing on ethnographic field work and interviews with police officers in three U.S. police departments, Peril on Patrol shows how policing's cultural preoccupation with danger and death shapes police training, practice, and policy. His other research interests include gangs, gun violence, social networks, and violence prevention. Sierra-Arévalo's research has appeared in a variety of social science publications, including the [link:https://www.pnas.org/content/116/40/19894]Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences[/link], [link:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1745-9125.12224]Criminology[/link], [link:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/lasr.12383]Law & Society Review[/link], and the [link:https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-lawsocsci-110615-085017]Annual Review of Law and Social Science[/link]. His writing and research can also be found in a range of popular outlets, including [link:https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2020/05/21/is-armed-protest-by-african-americans-treated-differently-history-says-yes/]The Washington Post[/link], [link:https://www.timeshighereducation.com/opinion/us-universities-should-invest-students-not-policing-them]Times Higher Education[/link], [link:https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/7/7/21293259/police-racism-violence-ideology-george-floyd]Vox[/link], [link:https://www.gq.com/story/how-violent-police-culture-perpetuates-itself]GQ[/link], and [link:https://www.wnpr.org/post/focused-deterrence-helping-curb-gun-violence-among-new-haven-gangs]NPR[/link]. Before joining the faculty at UT Austin, Sierra-Arévalo was an Assistant Professor in the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice. Michael received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Yale University and his B.A. in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. \m/ Hook 'em! \m/

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Jordan M Steiker

    Jordan M Steiker

    Professor , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1346, jsteiker@law.utexas.edu

    Steiker joined the faculty in 1990 after serving as a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court. He teaches constitutional law, criminal law, and death penalty law, and is Director of the law school's Capital Punishment Center.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Minority Voter Turnout


    Jacqueline L Angel

    Jacqueline L Angel

    Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 2956, jangel@austin.utexas.edu

    Angel has published extensively about the sociology of aging and how it is affected by the life course and social policy. She focuses on evaluating the impact of policies on the health and well-being of Latinos, immigrants and other vulnerable groups. She also serves as an adviser to professional committees, nongovernmental organizations and other agencies.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    , vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

    Defrancesco can discuss campaign and elections, political marketing, political psychology, immigration, race, ethnicity and gender. She speaks Spanish.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Kenneth F Greene

    Kenneth F Greene

    Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 7206, kgreene@austin.utexas.edu

    Kenneth Greene specializes in research on authoritarian regimes and democratization, political parties and elections outside of the United States, Mexican politics, Latin American politics, and research methods. His first book, Why Dominant Parties Lose: Mexico's Democratization in Comparative Perspective, shows why dominant parties are incredible durable and why many lost power by the close of the 20th century. He is co-editor of Mexico's Evolving Democracy: A Comparative Study of the 2012 Elections and was Principal Investigator on the Mexico 2012 Panel Study of voters as well as numerous surveys of voters, activists, and politicians in Mexico. His current projects include work on vote buying, campaign strategies, and voting behavior in new democracies. He has years of experience doing fieldwork on social movements and political parties in Mexico. His work has appeared in Political Analysis, the American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Foreign Affairs en Español, Política y Gobierno, Cambridge University Press, and a dozen book chapters in English and Spanish-language edited volumes. He is fluent in Spanish and his interviews have appeared in a variety of Spanish and Engish language publications and radio and television programs in Mexico and the United States. He is available to talk about Mexican and Latin American politics in English or Spanish, for quotation or on background.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Wendy A Hunter

    Wendy A Hunter

    Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    , wendyhunter@austin.utexas.edu

    Wendy Hunter studies Comparative Politics, with an emphasis on Latin American affairs. She has done in depth work on the military in Brazil and the Southern Cone, as well as research on social policy issues in Latin America, with special attention to the politics of education and health reform. She is the author of "The Transformation of the Workers' Party in Brazil, 1989–2009" (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and "Eroding Military Influence in Brazil: Politicians against Soldiers" (University of North Carolina Press, 1997), and has published articles in Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Political Science Quarterly, International Studies Quarterly, the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and World Politics.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Raul L Madrid

    Raul L Madrid

    Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 7246, rmadrid@mail.utexas.edu

    Raúl L. Madrid is Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin and an affiliate of the Teresa Lozano-Long Institute for Latin American Studies and the Center for Mexican-American Studies. He is also the faculty undergraduate adviser for the Dept. of Government. Professor Madrid specializes in Latin American politics, democracy studies, comparative ethnic politics, and comparative social policy, and he is currently working on a book on the origins of democracy in Latin America. He is the author of "The Rise of Ethnic Politics in Latin America" (2012) and "Retiring the State: The Politics of Pension Privatization in Latin America and Beyond" (2003), and "Overexposed: U.S. Banks Confront the Third World Debt Crisis" (1992). He is a co-editor of "Leftist Governments in Latin America: Successes and Shortcomings" (2010). His articles have appeared in Comparative Politics, Electoral Studies, Journal of Latin American Studies, Latin American Politics and Society, Latin American Research Review, Political Science Quarterly, Political Studies, and World Politics, among other journals.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Eric L Mcdaniel

    Eric L Mcdaniel

    Associate Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 7268, emcdaniel@austin.utexas.edu

    Eric McDaniel specializes in racial and ethnic politics, religion and politics and health policy. His book, "Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches" (2008), examines why Black religious institutions choose to become involved in political matters. Further, he has also examined the role of religious beliefs in shaping political behavior. His work in health policy examines how citizens interpret government involvement in treating health epidemics and how political empowerment can reduce health disparities. His recent publications include "What Kind of Christian Are You?: Religious Ideologies and Political Attitudes." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (forthcoming); “National Pride and the Boundaries of American Citizenship." Journal of Racial and Ethnic Politics (co-authored with McDaniel, Eric, L., Irfan Nooruddin and Allyson Shortle 2016).

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Foreign Policy


    Robert M Chesney

    Robert M Chesney

    Associate Dean for Academic Affairs , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1298, rchesney@law.utexas.edu

    Chesney is jointly appointed at the LBJ School and the UT School of Law, where he serves as the associate dean for Academic Affairs. Chesney's scholarship includes the legalities surrounding national and international security policies and the impact of technological and strategic change over time.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    William  Inboden

    William Inboden

    Associate Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 2411, +1 512 471 2601, inboden@austin.utexas.edu

    Inboden's policy and academic interests include national security and US foreign policy. Inboden is the executive director of the Clements Center for National Security and a distinguished scholar at UT's Strauss Center for International Security and Law.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Stephen  Slick

    Stephen Slick

    Director of the Intelligence Studies Project , Intelligence Studies Project
    +1 512 471 0814, sbslick@austin.utexas.edu

    Slick is an expert on contemporary foreign policy, international security, international relations, terrorism and intelligence.

    Immigration


    David L Leal

    David L Leal

    Professor , Department of Government , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 471 1343, dleal@austin.utexas.edu

    David Leal's primary academic interests are Latino politics and policy. His Latino politics research spans the fields of political behavior, public policy, and public opinion. His work also work incorporates insights from disciplines such as sociology, economics, ethnic studies, and religious studies. His research has also focused on how religion shapes political engagement, the political participation of non-citizens, the complexities of ethnic identity, and how veterans engage in politics. He continues to work on questions involving Latino political behavior and opinion, the politics of migration, religion and politics, and the military and society.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Monica M Martinez

    Monica M Martinez

    Associate Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
    , monica.martinez1@austin.utexas.edu
    Spanish Speaker

    Monica Muñoz Martinez is an award-winning author, educator, public historian, and active participant in developing solutions that address racial injustice. A national authority on the history of race, her research specializes in histories of racial violence, policing on the US-Mexico border, Latinx history, women and gender studies, public humanities, digital humanities, and restorative justice. Her first book "The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas" (Harvard University Press, Sept 2018) is a moving account of a little-known period of state-sponsored racial terror inflicted on ethnic Mexicans in the Texas–Mexico borderlands. She is currently at work on Mapping Violence a digital research project that recovers histories of racial violence in Texas between 1900 and 1930. Martinez is a founding member of the non-profit organization Refusing to Forget that calls for public commemorations of anti-Mexican violence in Texas. The team developed an award-winning exhibit for the Bullock Texas State History Museum in 2016 that marked the first time a state cultural institution acknowledged state responsibility for this period of racial terror in the twentieth century. Martinez also helped secure four state historical markers along the US-Mexico border.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Ruth E Wasem

    Ruth E Wasem

    Clinical Professor of Policy Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 9883, wasemruth@utexas.edu

    Wasem is an expert in immigration, asylum and citizenship; legislative development; unemployment and social welfare. 

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Environment


    Owen L Anderson

    Owen L Anderson

    Lecturer , School of Law
    +1 512 232 1446, oanderson@law.utexas.edu

    Anderson is an expert on domestic and international oil and gas law.

    Media Contact: Robyn Lindenberg, rlindenberg@law.utexas.edu, 512-232-6798

    Women's Issues


    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Victoria M Defrancesco

    Senior Lecturer , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    , vmdsoto@austin.utexas.edu

    Defrancesco can discuss campaign and elections, political marketing, political psychology, immigration, race, ethnicity and gender. She speaks Spanish.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Laurie B Green

    Laurie B Green

    Associate Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 736 1002, lbgreen@austin.utexas.edu

    Dr. Green's central research areas include the politics of race and gender in the twentieth-century U.S.; social movements; and cultural studies. She teaches modern U.S. history, with concentrations on women and gender in twentieth-century America, the Civil Rights Movement, the South, African-American history and comparative race and ethnicity. She earned the 2008 Philip Taft Labor History Book Prize for her book "Battling the 'Plantation Mentality': Race, Gender and Freedom in Memphis during the Civil Rights Era" (2007). The book was also a finalist for the 2008 OAH Liberty Legacy Award.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Sherri R Greenberg

    Sherri R Greenberg

    Professor of Practice , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
    +1 512 471 8324, +1 512 656 6592, srgreenberg@austin.utexas.edu

    Greenberg served as a Texas state representative for ten years, completing her final term in January 2001. Greenberg is an expert on Texas state government, public finance and electronic government.

    Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

    Christen A Smith

    Christen A Smith

    Director, CWGS , Department of Anthropology , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 6332, christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

    Smith's work focuses on gendered anti-Black state violence and Black communities' responses to it in Brazil and the Americas. She is particularly interested in the performative aspects of anti-Black violence, transnational Black liberation struggles and global racial formation. She also researches Black women’s experiences with state violence, anti-Black policing in the Americas, death squads, the paradoxical relationship between Black people and the nation-state in the Americas, and violence and racial representation.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    Christine L Williams

    Christine L Williams

    Professor , Department of Sociology , College of Liberal Arts
    +1 512 232 6321, cwilliams@austin.utexas.edu

    Christine Williams is Professor of Sociology and the Elsie and Stanley E. (Skinny) Adams, Sr. Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on gender, race, and class inequality in the workplace. Professor Williams is the recipient of the American Sociological Association's Jessie Bernard Award, a lifetime achievement award “in recognition of scholarly work that has enlarged the horizons of sociology to encompass fully the role of women in society.” She was also awarded the Distinguished Lecturer Award and the Feminist Mentor Award given by Sociologists for Women in Society. Dr. Williams' most recent publications analyze gender inequality and diversity culture in the oil and gas industry. Her most recent book, Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality, exposes how the social inequalities of gender, race, and class are embedded within consumer culture through an examination of low-wage retail work. Two previous books focus specifically on gender discrimination at work. These prior works were based on studies of men and women in nontraditional (gender atypical) occupations, such as men in nursing and women in the U.S. Marine Corps. She has also studied sexuality, homophobia, and sexual harassment in a wide variety of workplace settings. A co-edited book, Gender & Sexuality in the Workplace, was published in 2010. Dr. Williams edited the journal, Gender and Society, from 2003-06. She chaired the Department of Sociology from 2010-2014.

    Media Contact: David Oppenheimer, oppenheimer@utexas.edu, 512-475-9712

    For more information, contact: University Communications, Office of the President, 512-471-3151.