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Search results for "viruses"

 


Chandrajit L Bajaj

Chandrajit L Bajaj

Professor, Department of Computer Science, College of Natural Sciences
bajaj@cs.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 8870, +1 512 471 5133

Expertise: Image Processing, Computer Graphics, Geometric Modeling, Computational Biology & Bioinformatics, Data Analysis & Visualization. In one project, he's developing chemical imaging techniques that could enable earlier cancer detection by identifying the chemical make-up of individual cells in a biopsy. In another, he models the 3D structures of HIV and other viruses to search for drugs that might be a good fit.

Jaquelin P Dudley

Jaquelin P Dudley

Professor, Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Natural Sciences
jdudley@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 8415

Expertise: Animal viruses; retroviruses; breast cancer; oncogenes; transcription regulation; retroviral vectors; leukemia; communication

Karl  Gebhardt

Karl Gebhardt

Professor, Department of Astronomy, College of Natural Sciences
gebhardt@astro.as.utexas.edu
+1 512 590 5206

Expertise: Astronomy, black holes, globular clusters, elliptical galaxies, galaxy clusters, dark energy, HETDEX, Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment

David M Hillis

David M Hillis

Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, College of Natural Sciences
dhillis@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 5792, +1 512 471 5661

Expertise: Molecular evolution; vertebrates; systematics; evolution of viruses; endangered species; amphibians; reptiles; fishes; mammals; birds; molecular biology; DNA; genetics

Robert M Krug

Robert M Krug

Professor, Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Natural Sciences
rkrug@mail.utexas.edu
+1 512 232 5563, +1 512 232 5564

Expertise: Avian flu; viral gene replication and expression; human influenza; infectious disease

Douglas R Lloyd

Douglas R Lloyd

Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering
lloyd@che.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 4985

Expertise: The thermally-induced phase separation (TIPS) process is being used to form microporous polymeric membranes for a variety of industrially important applications. Of particular interest are membranes that can withstand high temperatures and harsh chemical environments, and membranes that have narrow pore size distribution. Specific targets are improved membranes for biological separations (such as hemodialysis and virus removal from blood), more robust membranes for industrial process streams, and more efficient separators for lithium ion batteries and NiCd batteries.

Lauren A Meyers

Lauren A Meyers

Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, College of Natural Sciences
laurenmeyers@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 471 4950

Expertise: infectious disease epidemiology, evolutionary dynamics, molecular evolution, viruses, bacteria, RNA, mathematical modeling, computer simulation, bioinformatics, flu, Ebola, Zika, malaria

Claus O Wilke

Claus O Wilke

Department Chair, Department of Integrative Biology, College of Natural Sciences
wilke@austin.utexas.edu
+1 512 232 2459

Expertise: computational evolutionary biology, bioinformatics, population genetics, statistics