Vietnam War Summit


The Vietnam War Summit held April 26-28 at the LBJ Presidential Library at UT Austin dives into a range of topics in an attempt to shed light on the lessons and legacy of the war. Faculty members from across campus offer expertise on the issues addressed by sessions and speakers covering:

If you are seeking expertise on other subjects, please call University Media Relations at 512-471-3151 or consult our general Media Experts Guide.



Foreign Policy


H W Brands

H W Brands

Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 3261, hwbrands@austin.utexas.edu

Henry Brands is a scholar of American history, broadly conceived. As a highly prolific writer, Dr Brands has published twenty-eight books, coauthored or edited five others, and published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe, the Atlantic Monthly, the Smithsonian, the National Interest, the American Historical Review, the Journal of American History, the Political Science Quarterly, American History, and many other newspapers, magazines and journals. His writings have received critical and popular acclaim. His books "The First American" and "Traitor to His Class" were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and the Los Angeles Times Prize. Several of his books have been bestsellers. His books and articles cover topics from the 18th century to the 21st, and include works of narrative history, interpretive history, and biography. He examines politics and foreign policy, business and economics, society and culture. He is the author of more than 20 books and is currently writing a biography of Franklin Roosevelt. Dr. Brands is a member of various honorary societies, including the Society of American Historians and the Philosophical Society of Texas. He is a regular guest on national radio and television programs, and is frequently interviewed by the American and foreign press. His writings have been published in several countries and translated into German, French, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

Robert M Chesney

Robert M Chesney

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs , School of Law
+1 512 232 1298, rchesney@law.utexas.edu

Bobby Chesney is a national security law specialist, with a particular interest in problems associated with terrorism. Professor Chesney recently served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detainee Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security, a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board, a non-resident fellow of the Brookings Institute, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the American Law Institute. He holds a TS/SCI clearance. Professor Chesney has published extensively on topics ranging from detention and prosecution in the counterterrorism context to the states secrets privilege (testifying in Congress last year regarding the latter topic). He has served previously as chair of the Section on National Security Law of the Association of American Law Schools and as editor of the National Security Law Report (published by the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security). His upcoming projects include a book (under contract with Oxford University Press) concerning the evolving judicial role in national security affairs. Professor Chesney's scholarship is posted on SSRN here. He also maintains a BePress Selected Works page here, though it is not as current as the SSRN page. For a complete list of his publications including works-in-progress, please see his CV (posted in the left-side column of this page). For those interested in following national security law developments, Professor Chesney welcomes subscriptions to his listserv, which focuses exclusively on distributing news of recent judicial opinions, new statutes, forthcoming scholarship, and other similar resources relating to national security and the law. Just send him an email if you'd like to subscribe. The course website for Professor Chesney's Con Law class is posted here. For National Security Law, click here. For Law and Terrorism, click here. Finally, to get the syllabus for the special one-week mini-course on terrorism and law, click here

Media Contact: Chris Roberts, roberts@law.utexas.edu, 512-471-7330

Janet M Davis

Janet M Davis

Associate Professor , Department of American Studies , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 1848, +1 512 471 7277, janetmdavis@austin.utexas.edu

Janet Davis teaches courses in American popular culture, and social and cultural history. Her teaching areas also explore American foreign relations, animals, American social movements, transnational American Studies, and modern South Asia. She is the author of "The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top" (2002), which won an Outstanding Academic Book Award from Choice. In her newest book "The Gospel of Kindness," she analyzes the relationship between the growth and development of the U.S. animal welfare movement and ideologies of American benevolence and exceptionalism from the Second Great Awakening to the eve of World War II. The project pays special attention to the religious dimensions of the movement, as well as its relationship to American expansionism.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

Angela M Evans

Angela M Evans

Dean , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 3200, dean.a.evans@austin.utexas.edu

Angela Evans is the Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs, the J. J. "Jake" Pickle Regents Chair in Public Affairs and a clinical professor of public policy practice. In her last post, during her career of more than 40 years working with members of congress, she served as Deputy Director of the Congressional Research Service - the agency created by the U.S. Congress to serve as its primary source of policy research and analysis. Her research focuses on the exchange of information between researchers and policymakers.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

William  Inboden

William Inboden

Executive Director , Office of the President; Clements Center for History, Strategy & Statecraft , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 2601, +1 512 471 2411, inboden@austin.utexas.edu

William Inboden is Executive Director of the William P. Clements, Jr. Center for National Security. He serves as associate professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and distinguished scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law. Inboden's other current roles include non-resident Fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States, senior advisor with Avascent International, and associate scholar with Georgetown University's Religious Freedom Project. Previously he served as senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council at the White House, where he worked on a range of foreign policy issues including the National Security Strategy, strategic forecasting, democracy and governance, contingency planning, counter-radicalization, and multilateral institutions and initiatives. Inboden also worked at the Department of State as a member of the policy planning staff and a special advisor in the Office of International Religious Freedom, and has worked as a staff member in both the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. Inboden has also served as senior vice president of the London-based Legatum Institute, and as a civitas fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in numerous outlets including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Sky News, and BBC. He has lectured widely in academic and policy settings, and received numerous research and professional development fellowships. He is the author of Religion and American Foreign Policy, 1945-1960: The Soul of Containment (Cambridge University Press) as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Inboden received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in history from Yale University, and his A.B. from Stanford University.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Bobby R Inman

Bobby R Inman

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 6716, inman@austin.utexas.edu

A former Director of the National Security Agency and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence, Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July 1982, when he retired with the permanent rank of Admiral. After retirement from the Navy, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) in Austin, Texas, for four years and Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer of Westmark Systems, Inc., a privately owned electronics industry holding company, for three years. In August 2001 he was appointed as a tenured professor at the LBJ School, holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Mark A Lawrence

Mark A Lawrence

Director of Graduate Studies , Clements Center
+1 512 475 9304, malawrence@austin.utexas.edu

Mark Atwood Lawrence is Associate Professor of History, Distinguished Fellow at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, and Director of Graduate Studies at the Clements Center for National Security at The University of Texas at Austin. Lawrence's research focuses on the history of 20th-century U.S. foreign relations. He has published extensively on the subjects of the Vietnam War and Cold War. Lawrence was the recipient of the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize and Paul Birdsall Prize for Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam (2006)

Howard T Prince

Howard T Prince

Clinical Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 4303, hprince@austin.utexas.edu

Howard Prince is a clinical professor and holds the Loyd Hackler Endowed Chair in Ethical Leadership. He served previously in the LBJ School as the Director of the Center for Ethical Leadership from 2000-2012. From 1990 to 1996 he served as founding dean and Professor of Leadership Studies in the University of Richmond's Jepson School of Leadership Studies, where he was responsible for the development of the first undergraduate leadership degree program in the world. He also held the George and Virginia Modlin endowed chair in leadership studies in 1996-97. From 1978 to 1990 Dr. Prince was Professor and Head of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York. While at West Point, he developed both graduate and undergraduate leadership programs and was instrumental in reshaping leader development throughout the U.S. Army. An honor graduate of West Point and a recipient of West Point's Distinguished Graduate Award, Dr. Prince also holds a Master of Arts degree in international relations from American University; studied economics, history, political science, and sociology at the University of Bonn in Germany as an Olmsted Scholar; and earned a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. As a young Army officer, Dr. Prince became a highly decorated combat veteran. After serving for more than 28 years in the United States Army, Dr. Prince was advanced on the retired list to Brigadier General upon his retirement in 1990 and presented with the army's highest award for service, the Distinguished Service Medal.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Jeremi  Suri

Jeremi Suri

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 475 7242, suri@austin.utexas.edu

Jeremi Suri's primary research interests include the formation and spread of nation-states, the emergence of modern international relations, the connections between foreign policy and domestic politics, and the rise of knowledge institutions as global actors. He has received numerous awards for his research and teaching, and Smithsonian Magazine named him one of America's "Top Young Innovators" in the Arts and Sciences in 2007. He is the author and co-author of nine books, including the widely acclaimed biography of one of America's most distinguished diplomats, "Henry Kissinger and the American Century" (2007), "Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy (2015, co-edited with Robert Hutchings), "Liberty's Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama" (2011), "The Global Revolutions of 1968" (2007), "Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente" (2003), "American Foreign Relations since 1898: A Documentary Reader" (2010), "The Twentieth Century: The United States and the World, 1898-1991" (2014), "The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft (2015, co-edited with Hal Brands), "Sustainable National Security Strategy: The Past and Future of American Power" ( forthcoming 2016).

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Media


Don E Carleton

Don E Carleton

Executive Director , Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
+1 512 495 4527, d.carleton@austin.utexas.edu

Don Carleton has been executive director of The University of Texas at Austin's Dolph Briscoe Center for American History since its creation in 1991. He has published and lectured extensively in the fields of historical research methods and sources, the history of broadcast journalism, and Twentieth Century U.S. political history.

Media Contact: Ben Wright, b.wright@austin.utexas.edu, 512-495-4204

Stephen D Reese

Stephen D Reese

Professor , School of Journalism , College of Communication
+1 512 471 1966, +1 512 471 1845, steve.reese@austin.utexas.edu

Dr. Reese's expertise lies in analyzing press performance, debates over news "bias," framing of public issues (particularly war and terrorism), the place of faith in the public arena, and changes in professional journalistic norms, including blogs. He is editor of the volume "Framing public life: Perspectives on media and our understanding of the social world" and wrote the Journal of Communication article "The Framing Project: A Bridging Model for Media Research Revisited."

Media Contact: Nick Hundley, nick.hundley@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-7209

Paul J Stekler

Paul J Stekler

Professor , Department of Radio-Television-Film , College of Communication
+1 512 471 6679, paul.stekler@austin.utexas.edu

Paul Stekler's documentary work about American politics and society includes "Last Man Standing" (broadcast on PBS's P.O.V. series). "George Wallace: Settin' the Woods on Fire" (winner of an Emmy and the Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival), "Vote for Me: Politics in America," a four-hour documentary series about grassroots electoral politics (winner of an Emmy, a George Foster Peabody Award and a duPont-Columbia Journalism Award); and two segments of the "Eyes on the Prize II" series on the history of civil rights. Stekler marries his political and media expertise as the host and executive producer for PBS's statewide Texas politics show "Special Session," while also teaching a campaign politics course at the LBJ School along with Matthew Dowd, chief campaign strategist for the 2004 Bush-Cheney campaign; Mark McKinnon, who oversaw advertising for the 2000 and 2004 Bush-Cheney campaigns; and Wayne Slater, senior political writer of the Dallas Morning News and coauthor of "Bush?s Brain: How Karl Rove Made George W. Bush Presidential." Stekler has a doctorate in government from Harvard University, has written about Southern politics, and was a political consultant in New Orleans. He has taught at the University of Texas' nationally recognized RTF film program since 1997. He also appeared on MTV's The Real World Austin as that season's boss, supervising the making of a documentary film about SXSW.

Media Contact: Nick Hundley, nick.hundley@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-7209

Military & Veteran Affairs


Elisa V Borah

Elisa V Borah

Research Associate Professor (Affiliated) , Center for Social Work Research , School of Social Work
, elisa.borah@austin.utexas.edu

Elisa Vinson Borah, PhD, is a research associate with the School of Social Work's Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health. She is an expert in military social work and the implementation of mental health interventions related to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) within military treatment settings. In her research, Borah has examined methods for reducing stigma among service members, the role of military unit cohesion in PTSD treatment gains, and the roles of military organizational culture and behavioral health provider factors on effective implementation of evidence-based treatments for PTSD..

Media Contact: Andrea Campetella, campetella@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-1458

Bobby R Inman

Bobby R Inman

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 6716, inman@austin.utexas.edu

A former Director of the National Security Agency and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence, Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July 1982, when he retired with the permanent rank of Admiral. After retirement from the Navy, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) in Austin, Texas, for four years and Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer of Westmark Systems, Inc., a privately owned electronics industry holding company, for three years. In August 2001 he was appointed as a tenured professor at the LBJ School, holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Howard T Prince

Howard T Prince

Clinical Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 471 4303, hprince@austin.utexas.edu

Howard Prince is a clinical professor and holds the Loyd Hackler Endowed Chair in Ethical Leadership. He served previously in the LBJ School as the Director of the Center for Ethical Leadership from 2000-2012. From 1990 to 1996 he served as founding dean and Professor of Leadership Studies in the University of Richmond's Jepson School of Leadership Studies, where he was responsible for the development of the first undergraduate leadership degree program in the world. He also held the George and Virginia Modlin endowed chair in leadership studies in 1996-97. From 1978 to 1990 Dr. Prince was Professor and Head of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York. While at West Point, he developed both graduate and undergraduate leadership programs and was instrumental in reshaping leader development throughout the U.S. Army. An honor graduate of West Point and a recipient of West Point's Distinguished Graduate Award, Dr. Prince also holds a Master of Arts degree in international relations from American University; studied economics, history, political science, and sociology at the University of Bonn in Germany as an Olmsted Scholar; and earned a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. As a young Army officer, Dr. Prince became a highly decorated combat veteran. After serving for more than 28 years in the United States Army, Dr. Prince was advanced on the retired list to Brigadier General upon his retirement in 1990 and presented with the army's highest award for service, the Distinguished Service Medal.

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Michael J Telch

Michael J Telch

Professor , Department of Psychology , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 475 8488, +1 512 471 3393, telch@austin.utexas.edu

Michael Telch joined the clinical psychology faculty at the University of Texas at Austin in 1986 where he is currently Professor and founding director of the Laboratory for the Study of Anxiety Disorders and former Director of Clinical Training. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the Association for the Advancement of Preventative Psychology. Dr. Telch is internationally recognized for his scientific research on the nature and treatment of panic, phobias and anxiety-related disorders. He has served as a scientific advisor to the National Institute of Mental Health's Anxiety Disorders Education Program and the National Institute of Mental Health's Panic Disorder Program. His published work has tackled a broad range of questions related to the nature and treatment of pathological fear across the full spectrum of anxiety disorders, and have utilized multiple research strategies including clinical trials, prospective longitudinal risk studies, experimental psychopathology, and controlled laboratory manipulations of cognitive, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies during exposure therapy.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

Paul B Woodruff

Paul B Woodruff

Professor , Department of Philosophy , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 4857, paul.woodruff@austin.utexas.edu

Woodruff is the Darrell K. Royal Professor in Ethics and American Society and previously served as Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies prior to holding the Hayden Head Regents Chair as director of Plan II. Widely known for his influential articles on Socrates and Plato, he has also published a critical edition of Plato's Hippias Major (1982) as well as translations of Plato's Ion (1983) and (with Alexander Nehamas) Symposium (1989) and Phaedrus (1995). He has also written on topics in aesthetics and ethics and translated works by Euripides, Sophocles, and Thucydides. One of America's foremost interpreters of Plato, Thucydides, and other Greek thinkers, Woodruff draws on thinking from ancient Greek philosophy and applies lessons from these highly reverent cultures to today's world in a variety of contexts - the arts, leadership, teaching, warfare, and the home.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

U.S. History & Culture


H W Brands

H W Brands

Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 3261, hwbrands@austin.utexas.edu

Henry Brands is a scholar of American history, broadly conceived. As a highly prolific writer, Dr Brands has published twenty-eight books, coauthored or edited five others, and published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe, the Atlantic Monthly, the Smithsonian, the National Interest, the American Historical Review, the Journal of American History, the Political Science Quarterly, American History, and many other newspapers, magazines and journals. His writings have received critical and popular acclaim. His books "The First American" and "Traitor to His Class" were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and the Los Angeles Times Prize. Several of his books have been bestsellers. His books and articles cover topics from the 18th century to the 21st, and include works of narrative history, interpretive history, and biography. He examines politics and foreign policy, business and economics, society and culture. He is the author of more than 20 books and is currently writing a biography of Franklin Roosevelt. Dr. Brands is a member of various honorary societies, including the Society of American Historians and the Philosophical Society of Texas. He is a regular guest on national radio and television programs, and is frequently interviewed by the American and foreign press. His writings have been published in several countries and translated into German, French, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

Don E Carleton

Don E Carleton

Executive Director , Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
+1 512 495 4527, d.carleton@austin.utexas.edu

Don Carleton has been executive director of The University of Texas at Austin's Dolph Briscoe Center for American History since its creation in 1991. He has published and lectured extensively in the fields of historical research methods and sources, the history of broadcast journalism, and Twentieth Century U.S. political history.

Media Contact: Ben Wright, b.wright@austin.utexas.edu, 512-495-4204

Janet M Davis

Janet M Davis

Associate Professor , Department of American Studies , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 232 1848, +1 512 471 7277, janetmdavis@austin.utexas.edu

Janet Davis teaches courses in American popular culture, and social and cultural history. Her teaching areas also explore American foreign relations, animals, American social movements, transnational American Studies, and modern South Asia. She is the author of "The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top" (2002), which won an Outstanding Academic Book Award from Choice. In her newest book "The Gospel of Kindness," she analyzes the relationship between the growth and development of the U.S. animal welfare movement and ideologies of American benevolence and exceptionalism from the Second Great Awakening to the eve of World War II. The project pays special attention to the religious dimensions of the movement, as well as its relationship to American expansionism.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

Mark A Lawrence

Mark A Lawrence

Director of Graduate Studies , Clements Center
+1 512 475 9304, malawrence@austin.utexas.edu

Mark Atwood Lawrence is Associate Professor of History, Distinguished Fellow at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, and Director of Graduate Studies at the Clements Center for National Security at The University of Texas at Austin. Lawrence's research focuses on the history of 20th-century U.S. foreign relations. He has published extensively on the subjects of the Vietnam War and Cold War. Lawrence was the recipient of the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize and Paul Birdsall Prize for Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam (2006)

Jeremi  Suri

Jeremi Suri

Professor , Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs
+1 512 475 7242, suri@austin.utexas.edu

Jeremi Suri's primary research interests include the formation and spread of nation-states, the emergence of modern international relations, the connections between foreign policy and domestic politics, and the rise of knowledge institutions as global actors. He has received numerous awards for his research and teaching, and Smithsonian Magazine named him one of America's "Top Young Innovators" in the Arts and Sciences in 2007. He is the author and co-author of nine books, including the widely acclaimed biography of one of America's most distinguished diplomats, "Henry Kissinger and the American Century" (2007), "Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy (2015, co-edited with Robert Hutchings), "Liberty's Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama" (2011), "The Global Revolutions of 1968" (2007), "Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente" (2003), "American Foreign Relations since 1898: A Documentary Reader" (2010), "The Twentieth Century: The United States and the World, 1898-1991" (2014), "The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft (2015, co-edited with Hal Brands), "Sustainable National Security Strategy: The Past and Future of American Power" ( forthcoming 2016).

Media Contact: Tori Yu, victoriajyu@austin.utexas.edu, 512-232-4054

Sam C Vong

Sam C Vong

Assistant Professor , Department of History , College of Liberal Arts
+1 512 471 4073, svong@austin.utexas.edu

A twentieth-century United States historian with specializations in Asian American history, international migration and refugee studies, and comparative race and ethnicity, he is also trained in the history of modern Southeast Asia. Dr. Vong's current research investigates the transnational politics of compassion that surrounded the migration and settlement of refugees and immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos from the late 1960s to the early 1990s.

Media Contact: Rachel Griess, rachelgriess@austin.utexas.edu, 512-471-2689

For more information, contact: University Communications, Office of the President, 512-471-3151.